Dentist in Orange, Mass. 01364

doctor, dentist, dental

There are lots of Dentists in Massachusetts. In reality, they all have get admission to to fixed requirements of training, tactics and data in regards to the recent construction within the dental field. Alternatively, not all of them are good at what they do, and which means that if you happen to fall in their arms, you are going to get mediocre products and services or a minimum of really feel so, way to the fact that each and every person has their very own personalities and attitudes which won’t resonate well with all sufferers. But that’s also the place we come in when you speak about discovering the best dentist in Massachusetts. Find a dentist office near me.

We’re pleasant and accountable

Our team of workers have a prime degree of experience in all dental spaces, plus we’re devoted and overly ambitious in our process. On account of the captivating personalities of our workforce individuals, patients have consistently built the sensation of trust in our judgement. For a few unexplained reasons, our clients have all the time depended on that we’re the most productive in Massachusetts. They have got at all times verified confidence that we are the fitting folks to wait to their dental wishes. But how do we have the capacity to maintain this dating with our shoppers? Find a dentist office near me.

Well, our crew of dental practitioners is made from pleasant and accountable body of workers members who be offering a streamlined appointment process, even as to ensure that our interplay with patients is at all times pleasant and memorable. This manner, we have controlled to draw many purchasers to our sanatorium in Massachusetts, and we imagine that our friendliness and popularity as a whole talk on our behalf. Find a dentist office near me.

We perform in a blank and up to date place of work

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We’re very so much fascinated by serving others

This can be very difficult to find dentists who are truly committed to serving others. Some people do it for the cash and not because it’s a calling. On the other hand, like any other business, the dental trade is instantly evolving to undertake issues that could no longer be associated with dentists a few 2 a long time ago.

Our group of workers members are releasing themselves up so as to dedicate their time to affected person. We also focus on working with complicated technology and training fabrics with a purpose to be offering the latest state of the art dental care within the greater house of Massachusetts. Our effort and time is directed against getting to sufferers, and thus turning in superior affected person care is our number 1 goal.

Subsequently, whilst most patients search for the best Dentist in Massachusetts, we frequently make the most productive candidate to select since we are very worrying, figuring out and social. This has allowed us to scale up our operation as a way to meet the growing wishes of our sufferers. It is because of this that you will have to most certainly try us and notice what we have to be offering.

Orange, Massachusetts

Orange, Massachusetts
Town
Downtown Orange

Downtown Orange
Official seal of Orange, Massachusetts
Seal
Location in Franklin County in Massachusetts
Location in Franklin County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°35′25″N 72°18′37″WCoordinates: 42°35′25″N 72°18′37″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Franklin
Settled 1746
Incorporated 1810
Government
 • Type Open town meeting
Area
 • Total 36.0 sq mi (93.3 km2)
 • Land 35.1 sq mi (90.9 km2)
 • Water 0.9 sq mi (2.4 km2)
Elevation 510 ft (155 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 7,839
 • Density 220/sq mi (84/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01364
Area code(s) 351 / 978
FIPS code 25-51265
GNIS feature ID 0618173
Website www.townoforange.org

Orange is a town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 7,839 at the 2010 census.[1] It is part of the Springfield, MassachusettsMetropolitan Statistical Area.

Part of the town is included in the census-designated place of Orange.

History[edit]

Orange was first settled in 1746, created from lands in the towns of Royalston, Warwick and Athol. The lands were not fully settled until the latter parts of the century, becoming the District of Orange in 1783, and finally being incorporated as a town in 1810. It was named for William, Prince of Orange. In 1790, the Millers River was dammed within town, and industry began in the former farming community. Small industry grew within the town, with the town being considered more of a mill town by 1840. By the late nineteenth century the New Home Sewing Machine Company was the largest industry in town, putting out 1.2 million machines at its peak in 1892. In 1900, it was home to the pioneer automobile company Grout, considered the first automobile built in a factory in the United States.[2][3]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 36.0 square miles (93.3 km2), of which 35.1 square miles (90.9 km2) is land and 0.93 square miles (2.4 km2), or 2.58%, is water.[4] Orange is drained by the Millers River, which flows through the center of the modern town. There are also several brooks within town, as well as several ponds and lakes, including Tully Pond, Lake Mattawa and part of Lake Rohunta. Only a small portion of the town is protected area, most of which is part of the Orange State Forest, with a small portion being part of the Warwick State Forest. Much of the northern half of town is spotted with swamps, and the town is home to three large hills, Temple Hill and Tully Mountain in the north and Chestnut Hill, the town’s highest point, in the south.

Orange is the easternmost town within Franklin County along its border with Worcester County. The town center lies 18 miles (29 km) east of Greenfield, 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Worcester, 42 miles (68 km) northeast of Springfield and 72 miles (116 km) west-northwest of Boston. It is bordered by Royalston to the northeast, Athol to the southeast, New Salem to the south, Wendell to the southwest, a small portion of Erving to the west, and Warwick to the northwest.

Transportation[edit]

The town lies along Massachusetts Route 2, the major east-west route across the northern part of the state. Except for the westernmost tenth of a mile, the entire road is a limited access highway through town. The highway portion ends at the junction of Route 2A, which passes just north of the Millers River near the town center, heading east into Athol and following Route 2’s former right of way. Orange is also home to the southern terminus of Route 78 and the northern terminus of Route 122. Additionally, the western end of the concurrency between Route 2 and U.S. Route 202 is just within town.

The Springfield Terminal railway passes through town, crossing the Millers River several times in the western side of town. The Fitchburg Railroad and later Boston and Maine once provided passenger rail service to Orange; however, these trains have long ceased operating and today only freight passes through the town.

Two local bus routes, the Orange/Greenfield Route of the Franklin Regional Transit Authority, and the Gardner/Orange Route of Montachusett Regional Transit Authority, provide service along Route 2A. MAX provides intercity bus service to Boston, Worcester, Fitchburg, and Brattleboro, Vermont with intermediate stops.[5]

The Town of Orange owns and operates Orange Municipal Airport (IATA: OREICAO: KORE), a small air service airstrip which also serves as a flight training center and parachuting center. The nearest national air service can be reached either at Bradley International Airport to the south or Manchester-Boston Regional Airport to the northeast.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1840 1,492
1850 1,701 +14.0%
1860 1,622 −4.6%
1870 2,091 +28.9%
1880 3,169 +51.6%
1890 4,568 +44.1%
1900 5,520 +20.8%
1910 5,282 −4.3%
1920 5,393 +2.1%
1930 5,365 −0.5%
1940 5,611 +4.6%
1950 5,894 +5.0%
1960 6,154 +4.4%
1970 6,104 −0.8%
1980 6,844 +12.1%
1990 7,312 +6.8%
2000 7,518 +2.8%
2010 7,839 +4.3%
Source: United States Censusrecords and Population Estimates Programdata.[6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 7,518 people, 3,045 households, and 1,979 families residing in the town. The population density was 212.6 people per square mile (82.1/km²). There were 3,303 housing units at an average density of 93.4 per square mile (36.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.29% White, 1.06% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.48% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.59% from other races, and 1.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.65% of the population.

There were 3,045 households out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.6% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.02.

Railroad station c. 1912

In the town the population was spread out with 26.7% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 92.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $36,849, and the median income for a family was $44,128. Males had a median income of $34,367 versus $23,967 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,361. About 5.8% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.4% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.

Events[edit]

  • North Quabbin Garlic and Arts Festival [17]
  • Annual Athol to Orange River Rat Race [18]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Orange town, Franklin County, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved August 29, 2012.
  2. Jump up^ Clymer, Floyd. Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (New York: Bonanza Books, 1950), p.14.
  3. Jump up^ Town of Orange, Massachusetts – A Brief History
  4. Jump up^ “Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Orange town, Franklin County, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved August 29, 2012.
  5. Jump up^ “MAX Schedule”. TrueNorth Transit Group. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  6. Jump up^ “TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1”. American FactFinder, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts. United States Census Bureau. 2010.
  7. Jump up^ “Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision – GCT-T1. Population Estimates”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  8. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  9. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  10. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12,2011.
  13. Jump up^ “1870 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  14. Jump up^ “1860 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  15. Jump up^ “1850 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1854. Pages 338 through 393. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  16. Jump up^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  17. Jump up^ “The Cult of the Cloves”. New York Times. September 29, 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-05. This weekend brings the North Quabbin Garlic and Arts Festival to Orange, Mass., near Amherst, and the Easton Garlic Fest to Easton, Pa. The Connecticut Garlic and Harvest Festival visits Bethlehem on Oct. 9 and 10.
  18. Jump up^ http://www.riverratrace.com

External links[edit]

Dentist in Wellesley Hills, Mass. 02481

doctor, dentist, dental

There are lots of Dentists in Massachusetts. In truth, they all have get right of entry to to fastened requirements of coaching, tactics and data regarding the latest construction in the dental field. On the other hand, now not they all are just right at what they do, and this means that in the event you happen to fall in their palms, you are going to get mediocre services and products or a minimum of feel so, thanks to the truth that each particular person has their own personalities and attitudes which won’t resonate smartly with all sufferers. However that’s also where we are available in while you discuss finding the most productive dentist in Massachusetts. Find a dentist office near me.

We are pleasant and accountable

Our team of workers have a top stage of expertise in all dental spaces, plus we’re dedicated and overly bold in our task. On account of the charming personalities of our group contributors, patients have persistently built the feeling of agree with in our judgement. For some unexplained purposes, our clients have all the time depended on that we’re the best in Massachusetts. They have always confirmed confidence that we’re the best folks to wait to their dental wishes. But how will we have the capacity to maintain this courting with our clients? Find a dentist office near me.

Smartly, our workforce of dental practitioners is made from friendly and responsible staff members who offer a streamlined appointment procedure, whilst making sure that our interaction with sufferers is all the time delightful and memorable. This fashion, we’ve managed to draw many clients to our health facility in Massachusetts, and we consider that our friendliness and reputation as a whole discuss on our behalf.

We function in a clean and modern office

Most people available in the market dangle the conclusion that eating place restrooms are a sign of kitchen cleanliness. Then again, the same can be mentioned a couple of dentist’s workplace in Massachusetts. For this reason, we have invested in a clean and brand new place of work which could also be furnished with up to date apparatus to lend a hand us do a neat job. Every consumer who walks through our doors finally end up feeling glad after knowing that we are without equal execs with regards to dental care and treatment. Find a dentist office near me.

We are very so much excited by serving others

It is extremely tricky to seek out dentists who are truly devoted to serving others. A few people do it for the money and no longer as it’s a calling. Alternatively, like another business, the dental business is quickly evolving to undertake issues that might not be related to dentists some 2 a long time ago.

Our team of workers contributors are releasing themselves up with a view to devote their time to patient. We additionally center of attention on running with complicated era and training fabrics with a purpose to offer the up to date state of the art dental care within the higher area of Massachusetts. Our time and effort is directed towards attending to sufferers, and thus turning in awesome affected person care is our no 1 goal.

Subsequently, while so much patients look for the most efficient Dentist in Massachusetts, we ceaselessly make the best candidate to pick due to the fact that we are very being concerned, working out and social. This has allowed us to scale up our operation as a way to meet the rising wishes of our sufferers. It is for this reason that you will have to more than likely check out us and spot what we have to offer.

Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts

Wellesley, Massachusetts
Town
Wellesley Square

Wellesley Square
Official seal of Wellesley, Massachusetts
Seal
Wellesley is located in Massachusetts

Wellesley
Wellesley

Location in Massachusetts

Coordinates: 42°17′47″N 71°17′35″WCoordinates: 42°17′47″N 71°17′35″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Norfolk
Settled 1660
Incorporated 1881
Government[1]
 • Type Representative town meeting
 • Board of Selectmen
Area[2]
 • Total 10.49 sq mi (27.2 km2)
 • Land 10.18 sq mi (26.4 km2)
 • Water 0.31 sq mi (0.8 km2)
Elevation 141 ft (43 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 27,982
 • Density 2,700/sq mi (1,000/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 02481, 02482, 02457
Area code(s) 339 / 781
FIPS code 25-74175
GNIS feature ID 0618332
Website www.wellesleyma.gov

Wellesley /ˈwɛlzl/ is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. It is part of Greater Boston. The population was 27,982 at the time of the 2010 census.[3]It has one of the highest median household and family incomes in Massachusetts.[4] It is best known as the home of Wellesley College, Babson College, and a campus of Massachusetts Bay Community College.

History[edit]

Wellesley was settled in the 1630s as part of Dedham, Massachusetts. It was subsequently a part of Needham, Massachusetts called West Needham, Massachusetts. On October 23, 1880, West Needham residents voted to secede from Needham, and the town of Wellesley was later christened by the Massachusetts legislature on April 6, 1881. The town was named after the estate of local benefactor Horatio Hollis Hunnewell.[5][6]

Wellesley’s population grew by over 80 percent during the 1920s.[7]

Historic district[edit]

The town designated Cottage Street and its nearby alleys as the historic district in its zoning plan. Most houses in this district were built around the 1860s and qualify as protected buildings certified by the town’s historic commission.

Geography[edit]

Wellesley is located in eastern Massachusetts. It is bordered on the east by Newton, on the north by Weston, on the south by Needham and Dover and on the west by Natick. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 10.49 square miles (27.2 km2), of which, 10.18 square miles (26.4 km2) is land and 0.32 square miles (0.83 km2) is water.[2]

Neighborhoods[edit]

  • Wellesley Farms
  • Wellesley Fells
  • Wellesley Hills (02481)
  • Wellesley Lower Falls
  • Wellesley Square (02482)
  • Poets’ Corner
  • Babson Park (02457)
  • Overbrook
  • Sheridan Hills

Recent construction[edit]

The town’s historic 19th century inn was demolished to make way for condominiums and mixed-use development in 2006.[8] The Wellesley Country Club clubhouse, which is the building where the town was founded, was demolished in 2008, and a new clubhouse was built.[5] The town’s pre-World War II high school building was torn down & replaced, with a brand new high school finished in 2012.[9] The entire 1960s-style Linden Street strip-mall has been replaced by “Linden Square” – a shopping district that includes a flagship Roche Bros. supermarket, restaurants, cafes, clothing stores, along with a mixture of national chains and local shops.[10]

Demographics[edit]

The Census Bureau has also defined the town as a census-designated place with an area exactly equivalent to the town.[2]

As of the census of 2000, there were 26,613 people, 8,594 households, and 6,540 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,614.1 people per square mile (1,009.4/km²). There were 8,861 housing units at an average density of 870.4 per square mile (336.1/km²). According to a 2007 Census Bureau estimate, the racial makeup of the town was 84.6% White, 10.0% Asian, 2.2% Black, 0.01% Native American, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.4% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.4% of the population.[2]

There were 8,594 households out of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.2% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.9% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.14.[2]

In the town the population was spread out with 25.1% under the age of 18, 13.9% from 18 to 24, 22.9% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 77.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 71.1 males.[2]

The median income for a household was $159,167, and the median income for a family was $186,518. The per capita income in the town was $72,046.[4] About 2.4% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.[2]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1890 3,600
1900 5,072 +40.9%
1910 5,413 +6.7%
1920 6,224 +15.0%
1930 11,439 +83.8%
1940 15,127 +32.2%
1950 20,549 +35.8%
1960 26,071 +26.9%
1970 28,051 +7.6%
1980 27,209 −3.0%
1990 26,615 −2.2%
2000 26,613 −0.0%
2010 27,982 +5.1%
* = population estimate. Source: United States Census records and Population Estimates Programdata.[11][12][13][14][15][16][17]

According to Boston Magazine’s yearly “Best Places To Live”, Wellesley ranks first in the United States in percentage of adults who hold at least one college degree.[citation needed]Over 66% of the households have at least one individual holding an advanced degree beyond a bachelor’s degree.[citation needed] In 2009, Wellesley ranked #2 in “America’s Most Educated Small Towns” according to Forbes.com.[18]

Government[edit]

The town government has been run by town meeting since the town’s founding.

Since Proposition 2½ limited property tax increases to 2.5% per year in 1980, the town has had to ask residents for a number of overrides to maintain funding for certain programs. Although the main 2005 override passed, a simultaneous supplemental override to preserve certain specific programs and services failed by 17 votes. The 2006 override passed with a large majority. Wellesley also receives funding from the state government. Local roads have been repaved several times in the 1990s and 2000s.

Central Street in Wellesley Square, looking west

Wellesley opened its new Free Library building in 2003, which is part of the Minuteman Library Network. Due to the structure of budget override votes and perhaps the size of the new main branch of the library, the two branch libraries—one in Wellesley Hills, which was purpose-built to be a branch library in the 1920s, another in Wellesley Fells—closed in the summer of 2006. The branch libraries reopened in September 2008.[19]

On December 18, 2014 Wellesley College and the Town of Wellesley announced that the College’s Board of Trustees had chosen the Town’s $35M bid for the purchase of 46 acres of land adjacent to its campus. Under this agreement, at least 50% of the North 40 property will be preserved in perpetuity as open space. A special town meeting in January 2015 resulted in a near-unanimous vote in favor of the purchase, and in March 2015, 80 percent of residents that casted votes at the Town election, voted to approve the purchase.

Services[edit]

Wellesley residents receive all major services from their local town government, with the exception of residential trash pick-up.

Municipal Light Plant[edit]

Wellesley is serviced by the Wellesley Municipal Light Plant (WMLLP). It is one of only a handful of municipal light plants in the state of Massachusetts. See “Green Power Community” under “Sustainability” below.

Recycling and Disposal[edit]

Residents of Wellesley cart their own refuse to Wellesley’s Recycling and Disposal Facility (RDF), a town-operated multi-use waste recycling site, where items are sorted by type, recyclability and potential reuse. Old books and magazines are available for town residents to take, which have their own shelving section. See more on Waste Management under “Sustainability” below.

The RDF also has a “Take it or Leave it” area where residents leave items they no longer want but that are in good repair. In 2004, the Town had to discontinue the “Take it or Leave it” because of funding cutbacks. However, within six months town residents reinstated it by means of a volunteer system. The section reopened with volunteers on duty at all times to organize the goods and ensure that only usable items were left there.

Education[edit]

Residence halls at Wellesley College

The town is known for possessing the second greatest concentration of residents with advanced degrees in the country. The public education services of the town are very well regarded, especially Wellesley High School; in 2007 it was ranked 70th best public high school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, earning a Gold Medal.[20]The following year, the high school’s accreditation was placed on warning status by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges Commission on Public Secondary Schools.[21]

On the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System test the district regularly scores higher than the state average.[22][23][24] The school system also contains a middle school and seven elementary schools (Bates, Upham, Schofield, Fiske, Hardy, Hunnewell, and Sprague.) The current members of the Wellesley Public Schools committee are Sharon Gray, Matt Kelley, Wendy Paul, Patti Quigley and Anthony Bent.

The town contains a private elementary school, Tenacre Country Day School, one private Catholic elementary school St. John the Evangelist and a preparatory school for girls, Dana Hall School. Also, the Wellesley A Better Chance outfit started in the early 1970s brings promising young women from underserved areas into town to attend Wellesley High School and live nearby.

Wellesley also contains the main campus of 3 colleges, Wellesley College, a women’s liberal arts college, Massachusetts Bay Community College, a two-year public college, and Babson College, a business college. According to Forbes.com, Wellesley College is the 6th best college in the country.[25] According to U.S. News & World Report, Babson College is the number one college in the country for entrepreneurship, receiving this distinction for the past fourteen years.[26] In addition, The Financial Times ranked Babson College as the 5th best U.S. college for providing custom executive education programs.[27] Part of main campus of Olin College, a private engineering school, is located in Wellesley, although its main entrance is located in Needham.

Transportation[edit]

Commuter Rail train at Wellesley Hills

Wellesley has had rail service to Boston since 1833. These days rail service is provided through Wellesley’s participation in the MBTA, which offers a total of 17 weekday Commuter Rail trains inbound towards Boston & outbound towards Framingham & Worcester. Wellesley’s stations are (east to west) Wellesley Farms, Wellesley Hills, and Wellesley Square. The Wellesley Farms station is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. MWRTA bus service also runs along Walnut Street, Cedar Street, and Route 9.

The highways Interstate 95 in Massachusetts/Massachusetts Route 128, Massachusetts Route 9, Massachusetts route 16 and Massachusetts route 135 run through Wellesley.

For elders and people with disabilities there is a specific MBTA-based service, The Ride, which offers free or low-cost door-to-door service by appointment.[28]

From nearby Riverside MBTA Station in Newton, commuter express buses run to downtown Boston, Newton Corner and Central Square, Waltham. This is also a station for Greyhound Lines and Peter Pan Bus Lines with frequent service to Boston, New York City, and other destinations.

Wellesley’s Council on Aging contracts out a daily low-cost minibus service offering elderly access to several local medical facilities and the Woodland MBTA station.[29] Further afield is the Springwell Senior Medical Escort Program / Busy Bee Transportation Service for rides to medical & non-medical services in the area. There is also a monthly minibus to the Natick Mall.

For Amtrak service the nearest stations are west in Framingham, east in Boston at Back Bay and South Station, and south in Route 128 Station in Westwood.

Those affiliated with Wellesley College can take advantage of their bus services to Cambridge & Needham.[30] Wellesley College & Babson College also both offer discounted Zipcar service.[31][32]

The nearest international airport is Boston Logan Airport at 18 miles from Wellesley.

Sustainability[edit]

Green Power Community[edit]

In February 2009 Wellesley’s Municipal Light Plant introduced the Voluntary Renewable Energy POWER TO CHOOSE program to improve home efficiency and offer a variety of options for the community to lower energy consumption. As a result, many residents, businesses, and the three colleges voluntarily pay a premium to purchase electricity generated by wind power.

In 2014 Wellesley ranked third in the nation for customer participation after Portland, OR and Sacramento, CA.

In 2012 Wellesley was designated a Green Power Community by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the only Green Power Community in Massachusetts and second in all of New England.

Also in 2012 the Wellesley Municipal Light Plant was the only green power supplier nationwide to receive the Innovative Green Power Program of the Year Award.

Reducing Carbon Footprint[edit]

In 2009 the Town established the Municipal Energy Efficiency Committee (MEEC) made up of representatives from various Town departments, to develop and evaluate municipal policies to reduce energy use.

In 2010 Wellesley’s Sustainable Energy Committee (SEC) was formed by Town Meeting. The Committee’s primary objective was a 10% Town-wide reduction in Wellesley’s carbon footprint; and 20% reduction in carbon footprint for all municipal departments by the end of 2013. In 2014 Town Meeting voted to support a new goal of 25% reduction by 2020 using 2007 as the base year.

The Committee is responsible for Wellesley’s adoption of the Massachusetts Stretch Building Code approved by Town Meeting effective January 2012.

In 2013 the Committee organized Wellesley’s Green Collaborative, a group of organizations that are concerned about environmental issues in Wellesley and beyond. Dozens of like-minded organizations are represented including Wellesley Conservation Council, a private, non-profit, land trust and conservation education organization incorporated in 1958, and Sustainable Wellesley, a group of volunteers who encourage sustainability in Wellesley and the surrounding area through events, education and action.

In 2014 the Sustainable Energy Committee served to double participation in the Town’s Voluntary Renewable Energy POWER TO CHOOSE program and organized the More POWER TO CHOOSE Solar Program.

Natural Resources Protection[edit]

Wellesley is the longest running Tree City USA community of any city or town in Massachusetts.

Effective July 1, 2011 Town Meeting passed Wellesley’s Tree Bylaw that requires property owners to protect certain trees and critical root zones during construction projects, and replace trees that are cut down or donate money to a special tree fund.

The Town’s Natural Resource Protection (NRP) Development bylaw, approved by Town Meeting in 2013 applies to any subdivision generating 5 or more lots. This bylaw requires a minimum of 50% of the property be preserved as open space in exchange for reduced lot sizes without increasing density.

Established in 1979, Wellesley has a unique elected Natural Resources Commission (NRC) bearing the statutory authority and responsibility of Park Commissions, Conservation Commissions, Tree Wardens, Town Forest Committees, and Forestry and Pest Control Officers. The Commission maintains Wellesley’s two Community Gardens and maintains a trail network that includes 26 miles of marked trails interconnecting open spaces and conservation lands for walking, dog walking, jogging, bicycling, cross-country skiing and more.

In 2001 the Commission in collaboration with the Health, Public Works and School Departments developed a Pesticide Awareness Campaign resulting in an Organic Pest Management Policy governing pesticide use on all town-owned property.

In 2003 the Commission created the Preservation Master Plan for Fuller Brook Park in collaboration with Wellesley’s Department of Public Works. This major restoration project will be completed in 2016.

In 2009 the Commission launched the Green Wellesley Campaign advocating for sustainability by raising awareness and promoting increased environmental action.

Green Schools[edit]

Wellesley Green Schools was established in 2006. Their No Idling Campaign received an Excellence in Energy and Environmental Education Award from the state of Massachusetts in 2014.

The Town’s new high school opened in February 2012 and includes such elements as green vegetated roof, geothermal heating and cooling, solar photovoltaic panel, and rainwater recovery systems.

Waste Management[edit]

In 2015 the Wellesley 3R (Reduce/Reuse/Recycle) Working Group was formed to consider possible initiatives to increase recycling and reduce waste in Wellesley. The initiative is a joint-effort of the Department of Public Works, Natural Resources Commission and Sustainable Energy Committee.

Economy[edit]

Wellesley is home to the headquarters of many local, national and global businesses including, but not limited to, BCC Research, Benchmark Senior Living, Blank Label Apparel, Eagle Investment Systems, EPG Incorporated, GrandBanks Capital, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Livingston and Haynes PC, Roche Bros., Wellesley Dental Group, and Sun Life Financial U.S.

Top employers[edit]

According to Wellesley’s 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[33] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Sun Life Financial 1,661
2 Wellesley College 1,200
3 Babson College 850
4 Harvard Pilgrim Health Care 490
5 Roche Bros. 330
6 Massachusetts Bay Community College 250
7 Dana Hall School 250
8 Wellesley Country Club 220
9 Biogen Idec 210
10 Towers Watson 200

Culture[edit]

Wellesley’s Wonderful Weekend[edit]

Each year the weekend before Memorial Day, The Town of Wellesley sponsors the annual Wellesley’s Wonderful Weekend which includes the annual Veterans’ Parade and Fireworks. The fireworks display is one of the most elaborate and spectacular shows that is done by local or town government in the United States. It is put on by Atlas Fireworks of Jaffrey, New Hampshire who also put on the Jaffrey Festival of Fireworks. On Sunday, May 18, 2008, The Beach Boys performed in a concert on the Wellesley High School athletic fields in front of an estimated 10,000 town residents and fans. The funds for the performance, an estimated 250 thousand dollars, were made as a gift by an anonymous donor and lifelong fan of the band.

The Wellesley Symphony Orchestra[edit]

The Wellesley Symphony Orchestra presents classical, pops, and family concerts at Mass Bay Community College at its Wellesley Campus.

Religious institutions[edit]

The town of Wellesley is home to several religious institutions. There is one temple, Temple Beth Elohim, and several churches: Wellesley Congregational Church, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, St. Paul’s Catholic Church, Christ Church United Methodist, Wellesley Hills Congregational Church (also known as The Hills Church), First Church of Christ-Scientist, St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, The Metrowest Baptist Church, Elmwood Chapel, and Unitarian Universalist Society of Wellesley Hills Wellesley Friends Meeting (Quakers).

Horticulture[edit]

The Wellesley College campus includes greenhouses and the H. H. Hunnewell Arboretum. This is not to be confused with the neighboring private H. H. Hunnewell estate. The Elm Bank Horticulture Center is home to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Although the entrance is in Wellesley, access is over a small private bridge over the Charles River, so Elm Bank is therefore in the neighboring town of Dover.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Board of Selectmen”. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b “Population and Housing Occupancy Status: 2010 – State – County Subdivision, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File”. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2011.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b Massachusetts locations by per capita income
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b Smolski, Anne-Marie (October 26, 2009). “Monument marks birthplace of Wellesley”. The Wellesley Townsman. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  6. Jump up^ Hinchliffe, Beth. “About the Town of Wellesley”. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  7. Jump up^ Schaeffer, K. H.; Sclar, Elliott (1980). Access for All: Transportation and Urban Growth. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-05165-4. Retrieved January 16, 2010.
  8. Jump up^ Lehmann, Barbara (March 29, 2006). “No rooms at the inn”. The Wellesley Townsman. Retrieved March 14,2010.
  9. Jump up^ Zak, Elana (September 4, 2009). “Wellesley High School project moving ahead”. The Wellesley Townsman. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  10. Jump up^ Lebeaux, Rachel (March 29, 2006). “Design Review approves Linden Street plan”. The Wellesley Townsman. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  11. Jump up^ “TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 13, 2011.
  12. Jump up^ “Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision – GCT-T1. Population Estimates”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  13. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  14. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12,2011.
  15. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). 1: Number of Inhabitants. Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21–10 and 21–11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  16. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21–5 through 21–7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1900, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  17. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  18. Jump up^ Detwiler, Jacqueline (January 5, 2009). “America’s Most Educated Small Towns”. Forbes.com. Retrieved February 24, 2010.
  19. Jump up^ “Branch Libraries reopen this week”. The Wellesley Townsman. September 4, 2008. Retrieved March 14,2010.
  20. Jump up^ “Gold Medal Schools”. U. S. News & World Report. November 29, 2007. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  21. Jump up^ ((cite news [url=http://www.wickedlocal.com/wellesley/news/education/x466662251/WHS-placed-on-warning|title=WHS placed on warning |newspaper=Wellesley Townsman |date=November 19, 2008))
  22. Jump up^ “2007 MCAS Results – Wellesley Public Schools”. The Boston Globe. 2007. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  23. Jump up^ “2008 MCAS Results – Wellesley Public Schools”. The Boston Globe. September 23, 2008. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  24. Jump up^ “2009 MCAS Results – Wellesley Public Schools”. The Boston Globe. September 14, 2009. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  25. Jump up^ “America’s Best Colleges”. Forbes.com. August 5, 2009. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  26. Jump up^ “Best Colleges 2011 – Best Colleges Specialty Rankings – Undergraduate business specialties – Entrepreneurship”. usnews.com. September 5, 2010. Retrieved January 7, 2011.
  27. Jump up^ “Executive Education – customised – 2010”. ft.com. October 11, 2010. Retrieved January 7, 2011.
  28. Jump up^ “The Ride Guide”. Retrieved February 25, 2010.
  29. Jump up^ “Town of Wellesley, Massachusetts – Transportation”. Retrieved February 24, 2010.
  30. Jump up^ “Wellesley College Transportation”. Retrieved February 24, 2010.
  31. Jump up^ “Zipcar: Organizations: Wellesley”. Retrieved February 24, 2010.
  32. Jump up^ “Zipcar: Organizations: Babson”. Retrieved February 24, 2010.
  33. Jump up^ City of Wellesley CAFR
  34. Jump up^ Google Books: Yellow Clover: A Book of Remembrance, (E.P. Dutton, 1922), quote viii, accessed January 6, 2012
  35. Jump up^ Eddie Yost at SABR Baseball Biography Project

External links[edit]

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Hopkinton, Massachusetts

Hopkinton, Massachusetts
Town
Town Hall

Town Hall
Official seal of Hopkinton, Massachusetts
Seal
Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts
Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°13′43″N 71°31′23″WCoordinates: 42°13′43″N 71°31′23″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Middlesex
Settled 1715
Incorporated 1715
Government
 • Type Open town meeting
 • Town
   Manager
Norman Khumalo
 • Board of
   Selectmen
Benjamin L. Palleiko, Chair
Todd Cestari
Brian Herr
John M. Mosher
John Coutinho
Area
 • Total 28.2 sq mi (72.9 km2)
 • Land 26.6 sq mi (68.8 km2)
 • Water 1.6 sq mi (4.2 km2)
Elevation 410 ft (125 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 14,925
 • Density 530/sq mi (200/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01748
01784
(Woodville P.O. Boxes)
Area code(s) 508 / 774
FIPS code 25-31085
GNIS feature ID 0619400
Website http://www.hopkintonma.gov/
Established by Edward Hopkins

Hopkinton is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, less than 30 miles (48 km) west of Boston. The town is best known as the starting point of the Boston Marathon, held annually on Patriots’ Day in April, and as the headquarters for the enterprise-oriented Dell EMC. At the 2010 census, the town had a population of 14,925.[1] The US Census recognizes a village within the town known as Woodville, reporting a population of 2,550.[2]

History[edit]

The town of Hopkinton was incorporated on December 13, 1715. Hopkinton was named for an early colonist of Connecticut, Edward Hopkins,[3] who left a large sum of money to be invested in land in New England, the proceeds of which were to be used for the benefit of Harvard University. The trustees of Harvard purchased land from the Native American residents with money from the fund and incorporated the area, naming it in honor of its benefactor. During King George’s War, natives raided the town, taking captives to Quebec.[4]

Grain was the first production crop grown in the area, while fruit and dairy industries were developed later. Agriculture predominated until 1840 when the boot and shoe industries were introduced into the town. By 1850 eleven boot and shoe factories were established in Hopkinton. Fires in 1882 and the migration of those industries to other parts of the country eliminated these industries from Hopkinton.

There are 215 Hopkinton properties listed in the State Register of Historic Places. The majority, 187, are located within the Cedar Swamp Archaeological District in Hopkinton and Westborough. The properties are also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Twenty-three properties are included within the Hopkinton Center Historic District, a local historic district which comprises properties around the Town Common, on East Main St. and the south side of Main St. The district was expanded in 2000 to include the Town Hall and in 2001 to include Center School. The Hopkinton Supply Company Building on Main St., located slightly west of the district, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Former factory worker housing in the center of town, contrasted against the more rural areas surrounding it, are visual reminders of Hopkinton’s past.

In 2005 the town established a second historic district in the village of Woodville. Ninety-seven properties are included within this district. The village of Woodville has retained its distinctive village atmosphere and strong architectural connection to Hopkinton’s industrial development and growth from the mid-to-late 19th century. The area was an early cotton clothmaking center and the site of a major shoe factory. When Boston seized Lake Whitehall for its water supply in 1894, the factories along its shores were closed or moved to other sites, as they were considered sources of pollution. Remaining factories and other buildings were destroyed in a fire in 1909. In the 18th century, it was an agricultural area with a few farms scattered north of the much smaller Lake Whitehall and its accompanying cedar swamp, and was the site of a grist mill on Whitehall Brook as early as 1714.

Within or near the Miscoe-Warren-Whitehall Watersheds ACEC (Area of Critical Environmental Concern), remains of large pits have been found. The pits were lined with bark by the Native Americans and used to store corn over the winter months.

At one time, it was believed that the waters flowing from the large swamp south of Pond St., under Pond St. and into Lake Whitehall contained magical healing powers. As a result, the area quickly was built up as a resort area. Visitors came by stagecoach to the Hopkinton Hotel, which was located between Pond St. and the lake. The mineral baths and their powers lured the visitors to the area. The baths can still be viewed by the edge of the stream that drains from the swamp. Within the ACEC area are also two beehive shaped stone structures, about 6 feet (1.8 m) tall. Their origin and use are unknown.

Hopkinton gains national attention once a year in April as it hosts the start of the Boston Marathon, a role the town has enjoyed since 1924. The town takes pride in its hospitality as runners from all over the world gather in Hopkinton to begin the 26.2-mile (42.2 km) run to Boston.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 28.2 square miles (73.0 km2), of which 26.6 square miles (68.9 km2) is land and 1.6 square miles (4.1 km2), or 5.82%, is water.

Hopkinton is 17 miles (27 km) east of Worcester, 26 miles (42 km) west of Boston, and 195 miles (314 km) from New York City.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the census-designated place for the village has a total area of 1.5 square miles (4.0 km2), of which 1.5 square miles (4.0 km2) is land and 0.22% is water.[5]

Adjacent towns[edit]

Hopkinton is located in eastern Massachusetts, bordered by six towns:

Climate[edit]

The climate in Hopkinton tends to be quite warm during the summer, with daily high temperatures averaging in the 80s. Temperatures in the 90s are also known to occur between June and August as high-pressure air masses push in from the south. Winters are typical of a Northeastern coastal climate, being considerably colder than the southern states, but not as cold as the Upper Midwest/Plains. Daily high temperatures from late December to March tend to be in the 30s increasing gradually to 40s, with some days dipping considerably lower or even higher. Nightly low temperatures are proportionately cooler.

The warmest month of the year is July with an average minimum and maximum temperature of 65 °F (18 °C) and 84 °F (29 °C) respectively. The coldest month of the year is January with an average minimum and maximum temperature of 16 and 35 °F (−9 and 2 °C) respectively.[6]

Temperature variations between night and day tend to be fairly limited during summer with a difference that can reach 18 °F (10 °C), and fairly limited during winter with an average difference of 16 °F (8.9 °C).

The annual average precipitation at Hopkinton is 51.25 inches (1,302 mm). Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year. The wettest month of the year is November with an average rainfall of 4.69 inches (119 mm).[7]

Normal temperature in January (max/min average) 25.5 °F (−3.6 °C)
Normal temperature in July (max/min average) 74.5 °F (23.6 °C)
Normal annual precipitation 44.9 inches (1,140 mm)[8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1850 2,801
1860 4,340 +54.9%
1870 4,419 +1.8%
1880 4,601 +4.1%
1890 4,088 −11.1%
1900 2,623 −35.8%
1910 2,452 −6.5%
1920 2,289 −6.6%
1930 2,563 +12.0%
1940 2,697 +5.2%
1950 3,486 +29.3%
1960 4,932 +41.5%
1970 5,981 +21.3%
1980 7,114 +18.9%
1990 9,191 +29.2%
2000 13,346 +45.2%
2010 14,925 +11.8%
* = population estimate.
Source: United States Censusrecords and Population Estimates Programdata.[9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18]

As of the census[19] of 2010, there were 14,925 people, 4,957 households, and 3,978 families residing in the town. The population density was 568.4 inhabitants per square mile (219.5/km2). There were 5,128 housing units at an average density of 195.3 per square mile (75.4/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 93.1% White, 0.8% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 4.4% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.8% of the population.

There were 4,957 households out of which 48.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.5% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.7% were non-families. 16.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.38.

Population was well-distributed by age, with 33.6% under the age of 20, 3.4% from 20 to 24, 22.0% from 25 to 44, 33.0% from 45 to 64, and 7.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.3 years. For every 100 females there were 96.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.4 males.

As of 2000, the median income for a household in the town was $89,281, and the median income for a family was $102,550. Males had a median income of $71,207 versus $42,360 for females. The per capita income for the town was $41,469. About 1.3% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Hopkinton village[edit]

As of the census[19] of 2000, there were 2,628 people, 1,003 households, and 672 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 611.3/km² (1,584.3/mi²). There were 1,024 housing units at an average density of 238.2/km² (617.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.18% White, 0.34% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.91% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.68% from other races, and 0.65% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.05% of the population.

There were 1,003 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.4% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 32.0% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 85.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.3 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $52,250, and the median income for a family was $68,050. Males had a median income of $48,050 versus $37,862 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $23,878. About 2.9% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 4.0% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Since its incorporation in 1715, Hopkinton has retained its original Open Town Meeting form of government. The town’s day-to-day affairs had been directly overseen by an elected Board of Selectmen until 2007, when the Town’s Charter Commission created a Town Manager position with more discretion, although the Town Manager still reports to the Selectmen.

Town Meeting[edit]

Begins on the first Monday in May and continues on consecutive evenings until the entire warrant is voted on.

Warrant[edit]

The Town Meeting Warrant is a document composed of the articles to be voted on. Any elected or appointed board, committee, or town officer or ten petitioning voters may request that an article be included on the warrant. Each article to be voted on is directed by the Board of Selectmen to an appropriate board or committee to hear and provide the original motion at Town Meeting. All articles which require expending of funds are directed to the Finance Committee; articles dealing with planning and zoning to the Planning Board; articles relating to by-laws to the By-Law Committee, and so forth.

Annual town election[edit]

Held on the third Monday in May. Polls are open 7:00am–8:00pm. All Hopkinton precincts vote at the Hopkinton Middle School (88 Hayden Rowe St).

County government[edit]

Massachusetts has 14 counties which were regional administrative districts before the Revolutionary War.[20] In 1997, the county governments of Middlesex, Berkshire, Essex, Hampden and Worcester were abolished. Many of their functions were turned over to state agencies.

Its county seats are Cambridge and Lowell.

County government: Middlesex County
Clerk of Courts: Michael A. Sullivan
District Attorney: Marian T. Ryan
Register of Deeds: Maria C. Curtatone
Register of Probate: Tara E. DeCristofaro
County Sheriff: Peter Koutoujian (D)
State government
State Representative(s): Carolyn Dykema (D)
State Senator(s): Karen E. Spilka (D)
Governor’s Councilor(s): Robert L. Jubinville (D)
Federal government
U.S. Representative(s): Joseph Kennedy III (D-4th District)
U.S. Senators: Elizabeth Warren (D), Ed Markey (D)

Library[edit]

The Hopkinton Public Library was founded in 1867. It has been located in the heart of downtown, just steps away from the Town Common, since 1895. Until 1955, bequests were the only source of funding for the library. Since that time, the town government has been appropriating public funds for employee salaries, cost of cleaning the Library, utilities and assistance with the purchase of books. The library is now funded through various sources that include the Town Government, The McGovern Trust Fund, Annual State Aid and Friends of the Library.

The town library was established by the Young Men’s Christian Association in 1867. Seven members served as the Trustees, incorporated the Library and adopted by-laws for the government of the Library in 1890. The current building was built in 1895 with contributions from local and former residents of Hopkinton. The second floor was used as a lecture hall and was remodeled later as a children’s room. A gallery was built to connect the Library building with the adjacent Episcopal Church after extensive renovation in 1967. This new section was named after the head librarian at the time, Mrs. Betty Strong. A special feature of the reading room is a stain glass window with a motif of water fountain bubbling water flowing over an open book and the inscription on the page reads “The fountain of wisdom flows through books.” The large hall clock that still stands near the circulation desk was presented to the Library by Mrs. F.V. Thompson and Mr. Abram Crooks.

The library was transferred to the town government in May 2010. Five members were appointed as the Library Trustees. Starting from May 2011, election will be held for the members of the Library Board of Trustees during the Annual Town Meeting.

In January 2016, the library moved to a temporary location at 65 South Street while the historic building on Main Street undergoes a major renovation and expansion.[21]

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

The Town of Hopkinton has a public school system which serves students from pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. The Hopkinton Public Schools maintains a district website with a subpage for each Hopkinton school. Kindergarten students and first-graders attend the Center School, located on Ash Street. Grades 2 and 3 attend Elmwood School. Grades 4 and 5 attend Hopkins School. Grades 6 through 8 attend Hopkinton Middle School. Grades 9 through 12 attend Hopkinton High School. The town also has an integrated preschool currently located in the Elmwood School building.

Hopkinton offered a fee-based full-day kindergarten option for the first time during the 2010-11 school year via a lottery system. Free full-day Kindergarten was made available to all Kindergarten students starting in the 2014-15 school year. Hopkinton Public Schools does not offer any foreign language education before Grade 7.

Since residents approved the Center School Feasibility Study in May 2008, Hopkinton had been involved in an Elementary School Building Project with the Massachusetts School Building Authority. The solution approved unanimously by the Hopkinton Elementary School Building Committee and the MSBA was to build a new K-5 Elementary School on the town-owned Fruit Street property and then decommission the aging Center School. Residents voted down the new school at the March 21, 2011 Special Town Meeting and again at a Special Town Election on March 28, 2011.[citation needed]

In May 2013 voters approved funding a new Center School Feasibility Study. The solution proposed by the new Elementary School Building Committee was to build a new Preschool, Kindergarten and Grade 1 School at 135 Hayden Rowe Street (Route 85), on property newly purchased by the town for this purpose. This proposal was approved by voters at a November 2015 Special Town Meeting. The new school is expected to open in fall 2018. It will be located near the Hopkins School, Middle School and High School, on the same two-lane road, Route 85, which is the main north-south road in Hopkinton.[22]

Hopkinton High’s school mascot is the Hiller “H”, as the sports teams are known as the Hopkinton Hillers. Previously the teams were known as the Hopkinton Stonethrowers. The school primary colors are green and white, with orange as a secondary color.

Economy and business[edit]

Hopkinton is the corporate headquarters of EMC Corporation, a global manufacturer of software and systems for information management and storage. It is the state’s largest technology company, which employs 6,800 people in Massachusetts. EMC, in addition to providing $1 million in annual real estate tax revenues, is a major contributor to the town’s schools and recreational services.[23]

Transportation[edit]

Hopkinton is situated 26 miles (42 km) west of Boston in the MetroWest region of Massachusetts. Interstate Route 495 divides the town into east and west zones, which are connected by numerous spokes providing direct access to the airport and other communities in the Greater Boston Metropolitan Area.[24]

Major highways[edit]

Hopkinton is served by two interstate highways and two state highways. Interstates 90 (the Massachusetts Turnpike) and 495, form an interchange on the northern border of Hopkinton and neighboring Westborough. Proximity to Route 9 (The Boston/Worcester Turnpike) and Route 30 in Westborough, gives additional access to east/west destinations.

Principal highways are:

Nearby major intersections[edit]

Mass transit[edit]

Rail[edit]

There is no passenger or freight rail service in Hopkinton.

Hopkinton is served by the Southborough MBTA Station, located on the border of Hopkinton and Southborough on Route 85 at Southville Road. MBTA commuter rail service is available to South Station and Back Bay Station, Boston, via the MBTA Framingham-Worcester Commuter Rail Line which connects South Station in Boston and Union Station in Worcester. Travel time to Back Bay is about 50 minutes.

Originally called the Framingham Commuter Rail Line, Framingham was the end of the line until rail traffic was expanded to Worcester in 1996.[25] The line also serves the communities of Newton, Wellesley, Natick, Ashland, Southborough, Westborough and Grafton.[26]

Direct rail service to Boston, to New York, and to many other points on the Amtrak network (National Railroad Passenger Corporation) is available through nearby Framingham.

CSX Transportation provides freight rail service and operates an auto transloading facility in nearby Framingham.

Bus[edit]

Air[edit]

Boston’s Logan International Airport is easily accessible from nearby Framingham. MassPort provides public transportation to all airport terminals from Framingham via the Logan Express bus service seven days per week. The bus terminal and paid parking facility are located on the Shoppers’ World Mall property, off the Massachusetts Turnpike Exit 13, between Route 9 and Route 30, at the intersections of East Road and the Burr Street connector.[27]

The Worcester Municipal Airport, a Primary Commercial (PR) facility with scheduled passenger service, is easily accessible. It has two asphalt runways 5,500 and 6,900 ft (1,700 and 2,100 m) long. Instrument approaches available include precision and non-precision.

Commuter services[edit]

Park and ride services:[28]

  • MassDOT operates a free park and ride facility at the parking lot at the intersection of Flutie Pass and East Road on the south side of Shoppers’ World Mall.[29]
  • MassDOT also operates a free park and ride facility at a parking lot adjacent to exit 12 of the Massachusetts Turnpike, across from California Avenue on the west side of Framingham.[30]

Media[edit]

Newspapers[edit]

Hopkinton has two local newspapers: The Hopkinton Independent and The Hopkinton Crier, and three online news outlets, HCAM, Hopkinton Patch and HopNews. The town is also served by The Boston Globe, The MetroWest Daily News, and the Telegram & Gazette.

Television[edit]

Hopkinton has a PEG television network known as HCAM, which controls two channels. Many HCAM shows can be viewed directly on their website.

HCAM-TV[edit]

HCAM-TV is the most-received of HCAM’s channels, available in every household with cable television in the area. It can be found on Comcast channel 8 and Verizon channel 30.[31] The channel’s daily schedule consists mostly of programming aimed at a family audience. Along with series and informative programming, HCAM-TV broadcasts the filming of one-time events (such as performances on the Hopkinton Common and films by the Hopkinton Center for the Arts).

HCAM-ED[edit]

HCAM-ED, sister channel to HCAM-TV, is received by less households and has lower programming standards than HCAM-TV. It is found on Comcast channel 96 and Verizon channel 31. The HCAM website also includes news articles and photos, updated daily.

Points of interest[edit]

  • Hopkinton State Park, part of the Massachusetts State Park system is located on Route 85 (Cordaville Road).[32]
  • Whitehall State Park is located on Route 135/Wood Street in Hopkinton.[33]

Accolades[edit]

  • June 2014 – Hopkinton made the ‘SafeWise 50 Safest Cities in Massachusetts’ [34]
  • 2013 National Citizen Survey results conducted by the National Research Center [35]
  • 2012 – Hopkinton ranked 4th in the Central MA’s Best Communities 2012 round-up [36]
  • 2009 – Money magazine ranks Hopkinton 19th best place to live [37]

Culture[edit]

  • Start of the Boston Marathon – Starting in 1924, when the Boston Athletic Association moved the starting line from Ashland, Hopkinton has garnered worldwide attention.[38]

Twin cities[edit]

Places of worship[edit]

  • Community Covenant Church
  • Faith Community Church of Hopkinton
  • Islamic Masumeen Center
  • Korean Presbyterian Church
  • St John the Evangelist
  • St Paul’s Episcopal Church
  • Vineyard Church of Hopkinton
  • Woodville Baptist Church

Notable people[edit]

Public buildings[edit]

Public buildings in Hopkinton:

Built Address Building
1775 13 Main St Library
1850 98 Hayden Rowe St Cultural Arts Alliance
1890 11 Ash St Center School
1894 85 Main St Old High School
1900 234 Wood St Woodville Post Office
1902 18 Main St Town Hall
1950 88 Hayden Rowe St Middle School
1964 14 Elm St Elmwood School
1973 83 Wood St Dept of Public Works
1996 73 Main St Fire Department
1997 104 Hayden Rowe St Hopkins School
1999 5 Cedar St Hopkinton Post Office
2001 90 Hayden Rowe St High School
2003 74 Main St Police Department
2005 28 Mayhew St Senior Center

Historic homes[edit]

Historical commission[edit]

The Town of Hopkinton established a historical commission which manages “the preservation, protection and development of the historical or archeological assets of such city or town”. Projects include conducting research for places of historic or archeological value, assisting cooperatively with others engaged in such research, and carrying out other initiatives for the purpose of protecting and preserving such places.

National Register of Historic Places[edit]

Hopkinton has two properties in the register.[40]

  1. Cedar Swamp Archeological District, Address Restricted. Listed 1988-05-23
  2. Hopkinton Supply Company Building, 26-28 Main Street. Listed 1983-03-10

Homes built in the 1700’s[edit]

The 26 homes below were built in Hopkinton in 18th century.

Homes built in the 1800’s[edit]

The 188 homes below were built in Hopkinton in 19th century.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Hopkinton town, Middlesex County, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved April 6, 2012.
  2. Jump up^ “Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Hopkinton CDP, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
  3. Jump up^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 160.
  4. Jump up^ “Collections, Historical and Miscellaneous and Monthly Literary Journal.”. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  5. Jump up^ “Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Hopkinton CDP, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
  6. Jump up^ “Hopkinton at Weather.com”. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  7. Jump up^ “Weather for Springfield area at Idcide.com”. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  8. Jump up^ U.S.G.S., National Climatic Data Center (Framingham Station)
  9. Jump up^ “TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1”. American FactFinder, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts. United States Census Bureau. 2010.
  10. Jump up^ “Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision – GCT-T1. Population Estimates”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  13. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  14. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  15. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12,2011.
  16. Jump up^ “1870 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  17. Jump up^ “1860 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  18. Jump up^ “1850 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1854. Pages 338 through 393. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  19. ^ Jump up to:a b “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-05-18.
  20. Jump up^ League of Women Voters
  21. Jump up^ “Expansion Project Pages”. Hopkinton Public Library.
  22. Jump up^ “New School Vote – Results and Next Steps”. eHop.
  23. Jump up^ “Boston Globe article”. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  24. Jump up^ Department of Housing and Community Development
  25. Jump up^ Changes to Transit Service in the MBTA district
  26. Jump up^ RDVO, Inc. “MBTA Map of Commuter Rail service in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island”. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  27. Jump up^ Map showing Logan Express in Framingham
  28. Jump up^ Park & Ride locations in Massachusetts
  29. Jump up^ “Map showing park and ride lot at Shoppers World”.
  30. Jump up^ “Map showing Park & Ride in West Framingham”.
  31. Jump up^ “HCAM-TV Schedule”. Hopkinton Community Access & Media. Retrieved October 16, 2014.
  32. Jump up^ http://www.mass.gov/dcr/parks/northeast/hpsp.htm
  33. Jump up^ http://www.mass.gov/dcr/parks/northeast/whit.htm
  34. Jump up^ “50 Safest Cities in Massachusetts”. SafeWise. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  35. Jump up^ “2013 National Citizen Survey”.
  36. Jump up^ “Hopkinton #4: Central MA’s Best Communities”. GoLocalWorcester. 29 June 2012. Retrieved 26 April 2016.
  37. Jump up^ “Money magazine ranks Hopkinton 19th best place to live”. MetroWest Daily News, Framingham, MA. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  38. Jump up^ “Boston Globe Hopkinton COMMUNITY PROFILE article”. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  39. Jump up^ “Town of Hopkinton, MA”. Retrieved 7 October 2014.
  40. Jump up^ “National Register of Historic Places Official Website–Part of the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior”. www.cr.nps.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-26.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

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Attleboro, Massachusetts

Attleboro, Massachusetts
City
Historic Attleboro train station

Historic Attleboro train station
Official seal of Attleboro, Massachusetts
Seal
Nickname(s): The Jewelry City, A-Town
Motto: Go Big Blue
Location in Bristol County in Massachusetts
Location in Bristol County in Massachusetts
Attleboro, Massachusetts is located in the US

Attleboro, Massachusetts
Attleboro, Massachusetts

Location in the United States

Coordinates: 41°56′N 71°18′WCoordinates: 41°56′N 71°18′W
Country  United States
State  Massachusetts
County Bristol
Settled 1634
Incorporated 1694 (town)
Reincorporated 1914 (city)
Government
 • Type Mayor-council city
 • Mayor Kevin Dumas (R)[1][2]
Area
 • Total 72.0 km2 (27.8 sq mi)
 • Land 69.4 km2 (26.8 sq mi)
 • Water 2.6 km2 (1.0 sq mi)
Elevation 42 m (138 ft)
Population (2010[3])
 • Total 43,593
 • Density 628.1/km2 (1,627/sq mi)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 02703
Area code(s) 508 / 774
FIPS code 25-02690
GNIS feature ID 0612033
Website www.cityofattleboro.us

Downtown Attleboro

Mill Street in 1908

Attleboro is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States. It was once known as “The Jewelry Capital of the World” for its many jewelry manufacturers. According to the 2010 census, Attleboro had a population of 43,593 in 2010.[3]

Attleboro is located about 10 miles (16 km) west of Taunton, the same distance to Providence, 18 miles (29 km) northwest of Fall River, and 39 miles (63 km) south of Boston.

History[edit]

In 1634, English settlers first arrived in the territory that is now Attleboro.[4] It was later incorporated from Rehoboth in 1694 as the town of Attleborough.[5] It included the towns of Cumberland, Rhode Island, until 1747 and North Attleborough, Massachusetts, until 1887. The town was reincorporated in 1914 as the City of Attleboro, with the “-ugh” removed from the name, although North Attleborough kept it. Like many towns in Massachusetts, it was named for a British town.

During the Native American insurgency in the colonial era, Nathaniel Woodcock, the son of an Attleborough resident, was murdered, and his head was placed on a pole in his father’s front yard. His father’s house is now a historical site. It is rumored that George Washington once passed through Attleborough and stayed near the Woodcock Garrison House at the Hatch Tavern, where he exchanged a shoe buckle with Israel Hatch, a revolutionary soldier and the new owner of the Garrison House.

The city became known for jewelry manufacturing in 1913, particularly because of the L.G. Balfour Company. That company has since moved out of the city, and the site of the former plant has been converted into a riverfront park. Attleboro was once known as “The Jewelry Capital of the World”, and jewelry manufacturing firms continue to operate there. One such is the Guyot Brothers Company, which was started in 1904.[6] General Findings, M.S. Company, James A. Murphy Co., Garlan Chain, Leach & Garner, and Masters of Design are jewelry manufacturing companies still in operation.

Geography[edit]

Attleboro is located at 41°56′N 71°18′W (41.933, −71.3) and has a total area of 27.8 square miles (72.0 km2), of which 26.8 square miles (69.4 km2) is land and 1.0 square mile (2.6 km2), or 3.59%, is water.[7] Its borders form an irregular polygon that resembles a truncated triangle pointing west. It is bordered by North Attleborough to the north, Mansfield and Norton to the east, Rehoboth, Seekonk, and Pawtucket, Rhode Island, to the south, and Cumberland, Rhode Island, to the west, as well as sharing a short border with Central Falls, Rhode Island through the Blackstone River. It includes the areas known as Briggs Corner, Dodgeville, East Junction, Hebronville, and South Attleboro.

The Ten Mile River, fed by the Bungay River and by several brooks, runs through the center of Attleboro. The Manchester Pond Reservoir lies beside Interstate 95, and there are several small ponds in the city. There are two reservation areas, the Antony Lawrence Reservation Area and Coleman Reservation Area, as well as the Bungay River Conservation Area in the north of the city. The highest point in Attleboro is 249-foot (76 m) Oak Hill, located in the southern part of the city north of Oak Hill Avenue.[8]

Attleboro sits on the border between the Massachusetts and Rhode Island regional dialects of New England English: the eastern part of the city is in the same dialect region as Boston, and the western part is in the same dialect region as Providence.[9]

Demographics[edit]

Attleboro is part of the Providence metropolitan area. It is a short distance from Boston, and is linked to the Boston metropolitan area.

As of the 2010 census, there were 43,593 people, 16,884 households, and 11,212 families living in the city; the population density was 1,626.6 people per square mile (628.1/km²). There were 18,022 housing units at an average density of 672.5 per square mile (259.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.1% White, 3.0% African American, 0.2% Native American, 4.5% Asian (31.5% Cambodian,1.3% Indian, 0.4% Chinese, 0.4% Vietnamese) 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.8% some other race, and 2.2% from two or more races. Hispanic and Latino people of any race made up 6.3% of the total (2.0% Puerto Rican, 1.7% Guatemalan, 0.5% Mexican, 0.4% Salvadoran, 0.3% Dominican, 0.2% Colombian).[22] Most of the Hispanic and Asian populations were concentrated in the East Side.[citation needed]

Of the 16,884 households, 33.3% had someone under the age of 18 living with them, 50.1% were headed by married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.6% were non-families, 26.4% were individuals, and 9.8% were people aged 65 or older living alone. The average size of household was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.11.[22]

The age distribution in the city was: 22.7% under 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% over 64. The median age was 39.5 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females aged 18 and over, there were 93.3 males.[22]

For the period 2009–2011, the estimated median annual income for a household in the city was $63,647, and the median income for a family was $71,091. Male full-time workers had a median income of $52,558, females $40,954. Per capita income was $30,039. About 4.2% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.4% of those under 18 and 7.8% of those aged 65 or over.[23]

Education[edit]

Attleboro’s school department has five elementary schools (Hill-Roberts, Hyman Fine, A. Irvin Studley, Peter Thacher and Thomas Willett), three middle schools (Brennan, Coelho and Wamsutta), and one high school. Attleboro High School has its own vocational division, and its football team (the “Blue Bombardiers”) has a traditional rivalry with North Attleborough High School, whom they play for their Thanksgiving Day football game. Bishop Feehan High School is a co-educational Roman Catholic high school which opened in 1961 and is named for Bishop Daniel Francis Feehan, second Bishop of the Diocese of Fall River. The city also has a satellite branch of Bristol Community College, which used to be housed in the city’s former high school building but has since been relocated to an old Texas Instruments site. Bridgewater State University opened a satellite site in Attleboro in 2009, sharing space with Bristol Community College.

Points of interest[edit]

Downtown, about 1909

Attleboro has four museums: the Attleboro Arts Museum, the Attleboro Area Industrial Museum,[24] the Women at Work Museum, and the Museum at the Mill. Other places of interest in the city include: Capron Park Zoo;[25] L.G. Balfour Riverwalk, which was once the site of the L.G. Balfour jewelry plant, adjacent to the downtown business district; La Salette Shrine, which has a display of Christmas lights;[26] Triboro Youth Theatre / Triboro Musical Theatre;[27] Attleboro Community Theatre;[28] and Dodgeville Mill.

Revitalization[edit]

In December 2011, the City of Attleboro was awarded $5.4 million in state and federal funding to support revitalization efforts within the city’s Historic Downtown area.[29]The city’s “Downtown Redevelopment and Revitalization Project”[29] is intended to transform underutilized industrial and commercial parcels into areas of mixed use that include commercial, recreational, and residential space. The project also includes transportation improvements to both MBTA rail and GATRA bus services along with enhanced road construction.[29]

The city project was also selected for the state Brownfield Support Team (BST) Initiative,[29] which encourages collaboration between state, local, and federal government to address complex issues to help pave the way for economic development opportunities in cities and towns across the state of Massachusetts. Contributing BST organizations include the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection(MassDEP), MassDevelopment, the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT).[29]

Congressman Jim McGovern highlighted the importance of this project in 2011 by saying, “This transformative funding presents a landmark opportunity for Attleboro to reshape its downtown and make a strong community even stronger. The new transit plan, when implemented, will make Attleboro a model for other small cities, and the aggressive reclaiming of contaminated sites will enhance economic development.”[29]

Transportation[edit]

Attleboro is located beside Interstate 95 (which enters the state between Attleboro and Pawtucket, Rhode Island), I-295 (whose northern terminus is near the North Attleborough town line at I-95), US Route 1, and Routes 1A, 118, 123 and 152, the last three of which intersect at Attleboro center. The proposed Interstate 895 was to run through Attleboro and have a junction at the present day I-295/I-95 terminus. When driving from Rhode Island on I-295, the stub exits before the half-cloverleaf exit to I-95.

The city is home to two MBTA commuter rail stations: one in the downtown area and the other in the South Attleboro district, near the Rhode Island border. Attleboro and Taunton are both served by the Greater Attleboro Taunton Regional Transit Authority, or GATRA, which provides bus transit between the two cities and the surrounding regions.

Religion[edit]

Religions represented in Attleboro reflect the historic ethnic makeup of the community. The three Roman Catholic churches—St. John, St. Theresa of the Little Flower, and St. Vincent de Paul—reflect the English and Irish, the former French (now Hispanic), and the Portuguese neighborhoods, respectively.

All Saints Episcopal Church (1890) on North Main Street provides a traditional Anglican presence, although the church is now very diverse. In 2007 it divided over the liberal policies of the US Episcopal Church, resulting in the establishment of All Saints Anglican Church in the Hebronville village of Attleboro. This church is affiliated with an Anglican diocese in Uganda.

Centenary United Methodist Church[30] on North Main Street began on November 26, 1865, as a fellowship meeting in a building on Railroad Avenue. The first church building on the present site was dedicated in 1896 under the name of Davis Methodist Episcopal Church. The structure was destroyed by fire in 1883. The rebuilt church was named Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church in 1884, commemorating American Methodism’s 100th anniversary. In 1998 Centenary and the Hebron Methodist were consolidated into one church.

Second Congregational Church (1748), near the town common, is typical of a New England town and is the founding church of what was then East Attleboro. It is a daughter church of the First Congregational Church in the Oldtown section of North Attleborough. Originally located in a meeting house on what is now the common, Second Congregational had a stately white clapboard building built in 1825. It was removed in the early 1950s to make way for the addition of a new Fellowship Hall and education rooms. The main red brick building and clock tower were built in 1904 beside the white church. In the early 1960s the interior of the sanctuary and the entrance were dramatically remodeled, resulting in a blend of high Victorian style and the open feel of mid-century modern. The church owns the Old Kirk Yard Cemetery to its rear, where many of the town’s earliest families are buried. In its tower is the clock, owned originally by the city and now by the church. The Jack & Jill School has operated at the church for over 60 years. One of the city’s elementary schools is named in honor of the church’s first settled minister, the Reverend Peter Thacher.

Protestant denominations represented in Attleboro include Baptist (Grace Baptist on Oakhill Avenue, Word of Truth Baptist on Union Street,[31] and First Baptist on South Main), Advent Christian (also on Pleasant), Fruit of the Spirit Mission Church (Leroy Street), and Assembly of God (the South Attleboro AOG on Newport Avenue). The Bethany Village Fellowship, formerly Bethany Congregational Church, (1886) is in Newport Avenue. Murray Unitarian-Universalist Church (1875) is on North Main Street.[32] Evangelical Covenant Church (1903) on North Main Street recently celebrated its 100th anniversary. It was once “the Swedish church”, but includes many different ethnic groups[clarification needed] today. Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses is located on Commonwealth Avenue.

There are also numerous non-denominational churches such as Christian & Missionary Alliance (Faith Alliance Church on Pleasant Street[33]), Good News Bible Chapel on West Street (1935),[34] New Covenant Christian Fellowship on North Main Street,[35] Candleberry Ministries on South Main Street,[36] and a handful of ethnic congregations such as St. James Anglican Church (Kenyan) which was started through church planting.

  • The Salvation Army Bridges of Hope on Mechanic Street holds Sunday services and weekday and evening support services, including “Bridging the Gap” for adolescents.
  • The Immanuel Lutheran Church offers Sunday services.
  • The Attleboro Area Council of Churches is very active in the community.
  • Congregation Agudas Achim on Kelly Boulevard is part of the Jewish Reconstructionist movement.

Cancer[edit]

In late 2003, The Sun Chronicle reported that a state investigation had been launched into the deaths of four women in the city from glioblastoma.[citation needed] In 2007, the State of Massachusetts issued a report concluding that although the diagnosis rate for brain and central nervous system (CNS) cancers was higher than expected when compared to statewide data, the increase was determined not to be statistically significant.[37]

Scorecard, Environmental Defense‘s online database of polluters, lists seven facilities contributing to cancer hazards in Attleboro, including Engineered Materials Solutions Inc., the worst offender in Massachusetts.[38]

In 2002, the Massachusetts Public Health Department was asked to evaluate the former Shpack Landfill, on the border of Norton and Attleboro, for its cancer risks. The investigation continued at least through 2004.[39][40] The informal landfill included uranium fuel rods, heavy metals, and volatile organic compounds.[41]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Mayor”. City of Attleboro. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  2. Jump up^ Hand, Jim (13 February 2014). “Republican Attleboro mayor backs Democrat Kennedy for re-election”. The Sun Chronicle. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b “Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Attleboro city, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the originalon September 11, 2013. Retrieved December 2, 2011.
  4. Jump up^ “Attleboro Timeline”. City of Attleboro Historical Commission. Retrieved 2012-05-30.
  5. Jump up^ “Sketch of the History of Attleborough: From Its Settlement to the Present Time”. Mocavo. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
  6. Jump up^ “Brief history of jewelry findings manufacturer Guyot Brothers”. Guyot Brothers Company, Inc. 2003–2007. Archived from the originalon 15 June 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  7. Jump up^ “Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Attleboro city, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved February 5, 2013.
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  12. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  13. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
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  15. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  16. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  17. Jump up^ “1870 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  18. Jump up^ “1860 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
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  20. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). 1: Number of Inhabitants. Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21–07 through 21-09, Massachusetts Table 4. Population of Urban Places of 10,000 or more from Earliest Census to 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  21. Jump up^ “Census of Population and Housing”. Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 11, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  22. ^ Jump up to:a b c “Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Attleboro city, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved February 5, 2013.
  23. Jump up^ “Selected Economic Characteristics: 2009–2011 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates (DP03): Attleboro city, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved February 5, 2013.
  24. Jump up^ “About Attleboro Area Industrial Museum”. Attleboro Area Industrial Museum, Inc. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-04-23. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  25. Jump up^ “About the Capron Park Zoo”. Capron Park Zoo. 2007. Archivedfrom the original on 7 June 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  26. Jump up^ “The History of the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette”. National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-02-23. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  27. Jump up^ “Triboro Youth Theatre”. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-02-22. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  28. Jump up^ “Attleboro Community Theatre, Inc.”. Attleboro Community Theatre, Inc. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
  29. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Official Website of the Governor of Massachusetts. (2011). Lieutenant Governor Murray Announces $5.4 Million to Support Attleboro’s Downtown Redevelopment and Revitalization Project [Press Release] Retrieved from http://www.mass.gov/governor/pressoffice/pressreleases/2011/111216-attleboro-redevelopment-plan.html
  30. Jump up^ “Centenary United Methodist Church – Come and See – Go and Tell – Attleboro, MA”. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
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  33. Jump up^ “Faith Alliance Church of Attleboro, MA”. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
  34. Jump up^ “Good News Bible Chapel”. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
  35. Jump up^ New Covenant Christian Fellowship
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  40. Jump up^ Massey, Joanna (January 25, 2004). “Norton leaders upset at US delay on cleanup”. The Boston Globe. Archived from the originalon March 13, 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  41. Jump up^ “Waste Site Cleanup & Reuse in New England — Shpack Landfill”. US Environmental Protection Agency. February 15, 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  42. Jump up^ A Memorial of George Bradburn, Frances H. Bradburn, 1883
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  45. Jump up^ “Weygand, Robert A”. The United States Congress. Retrieved 2007-06-21.

External links[edit]

Dentist in Worcester, Mass. 01604

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Worcester, Massachusetts

Downtown Worcester, Massachusetts.jpg
City Hall - Worcester, Massachusetts USA.JPG Union Station November 2012.JPG
Worcester Public Library.JPG DCU Center - Worcester, Massachusetts USA.JPG
WorcesterMA AntiquarianSociety 2.jpg JonasClarkBuilding.JPG
Paul Revere Road Worcester.JPG Charles Lundberg Three Decker, Worcester MA.jpg
Flag of Worcester, Massachusetts
Flag
Official seal of Worcester, Massachusetts
Seal
Nickname(s): The City of the Seven Hills, The Heart of the Commonwealth, Wormtown, Woo-town, The Woo
Location in Worcester County and the state of Massachusetts
Location in Worcester County and the state of Massachusetts
Worcester, Massachusetts is located in the US

Worcester, Massachusetts
Worcester, Massachusetts

Location in the United States

Coordinates: 42°16′N 71°48′WCoordinates: 42°16′N 71°48′W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Worcester
Settled 1673
Incorporated as a town June 14, 1722
Incorporated as a city February 29, 1848
Government
 • Type Council-manager
 • City Manager Edward M. Augustus, Jr.
 • Mayor Joseph Petty
Area
 • City 38.6 sq mi (99.9 km2)
 • Land 37.6 sq mi (97.3 km2)
 • Water 1.0 sq mi (2.6 km2)
Elevation 480 ft (146 m)
Population (2014 est.)
 • City 183,016
 • Density 4,678.1/sq mi (1,807.8/km2)
 • Metro 923,672
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01601–01610, 01612–01615, 01653–01655
Area code(s) 508 / 774
FIPS code 0 25-82000
GNIS feature ID 0617867
Website www.worcesterma.gov

Worcester (/ˈwʊstər/ wuuss-tər, locally also Listeni/ˈwstə/ wiss-tə)[1] is a city and the historic county seat of Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States until most of Massachusetts disbanded county government in 1998. Named after Worcester, England, as of the 2010 Census the city’s population was 181,045,[2] making it the second largest city in New England after Boston.[3] Worcester is located approximately 40 miles (64 km) west of Boston, 50 miles (80 km) east of Springfield and 40 miles (64 km) north of Providence. Due to its location in Central Massachusetts, amidst Massachusetts’ major metropolitan regions, Worcester is known as the “Heart of the Commonwealth”, thus, a heart is the official symbol of the city. However, the heart symbol may also have its provenance in lore that Valentine’s Day cards were invented in the city.[4]

Worcester was considered its own region for centuries; however, with the encroachment of Boston’s suburbs in the 1970s after the construction of Interstate 495 and Interstate 290, it now marks the western periphery of the Boston-Worcester-Providence (MA-RI-NH) U.S. Census Combined Statistical Area (CSA), or Greater Boston. The city features many examples of Victorian-era mill architecture.

History[edit]

History and corner stone of Worcester, Massachusetts

The area was first inhabited by members of the Nipmuc tribe. The native people called the region Quinsigamond and built a settlement on Pakachoag Hill in Auburn.[5]In 1673 English settlers John Eliot and Daniel Gookin led an expedition to Quinsigamond to establish a new Christian Indian “praying town” and identify a new location for an English settlement. On July 13, 1674, Gookin obtained a deed to eight square miles of land in Quinsigamond from the Nipmuc people and English traders and settlers began to inhabit the region.[6]

In 1675, King Philip’s War broke out throughout New England with the Nipmuc Indians coming to the aid of Indian leader King Philip. The English settlers completely abandoned the Quinsigamond area and the empty buildings were burned by the Indian forces. The town was again abandoned during Queen Anne’s War in 1702.[6]Finally in 1713, Worcester was permanently resettled for a third time by Jonas Rice.[7] Named after the city of Worcester, England, the town was incorporated on June 14, 1722.[8] On April 2, 1731, Worcester was chosen as the county seat of the newly founded Worcester County government. Between 1755 and 1758, future U.S. president John Adams worked as a schoolteacher and studied law in Worcester.

Star on the sidewalk marking where the Declaration of Independence was first read

The Star on the Sidewalk indicates the spot of the first reading in New England of the Declaration of Independence in 1776[9]

In the 1770s, Worcester became a center of American revolutionary activity. British General Thomas Gage was given information of patriot ammunition stockpiled in Worcester in 1775. Also in 1775, Massachusetts Spy publisher Isaiah Thomas moved his radical newspaper out of British occupied Boston to Worcester. Thomas would continuously publish his paper throughout the American Revolutionary War. On July 14, 1776, Thomas performed the first public reading in Massachusetts of the Declaration of Independence in front of the Worcester town hall. He would later go on to form the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester in 1812.[10]

Triple-deckers on Houghton Street

During the turn of the 19th century Worcester’s economy moved into manufacturing. Factories producing textiles, shoes and clothing opened along the nearby Blackstone River. However, the manufacturing industry in Worcester would not begin to thrive until the opening of the Blackstone Canal in 1828 and the opening of the Worcester and Boston Railroad in 1835. The city transformed into a transportation hub and the manufacturing industry flourished.[11] Worcester was officially chartered as a city on February 29, 1848.[8] The city’s industries soon attracted immigrants of primarily Irish, French, and Swedish descent in the mid-19th century and later many immigrants of Lithuanian, Polish, Italian, Greek, Turkish and Armenian descent.[12] Immigrants moved into new triple-decker houses which lined hundreds of Worcester’s expanding streets and neighborhoods.[13]

Worcester Common in 1907, established in 1669

In 1831 Ichabod Washburn opened the Washburn & Moen Company. The company would become the largest wire manufacturing in the country and Washburn became one of the leading industrial and philanthropic figures in the city.[12][14]

Worcester would become a center of machinery, wire products and power looms and boasted large manufacturers, Washburn & Moen, Wyman-Gordon Company, American Steel & Wire, Morgan Construction and the Norton Company. In 1908 the Royal Worcester Corset Factory was the largest employer of women in the United States.[15]

Worcester would also claim many inventions and firsts. New England Candlepin bowling was invented in Worcester by Justin White in 1879. Esther Howland began the first line of Valentine’s Day cards from her Worcester home in 1847. Loring Coes invented the first monkey wrench and Russell Hawes created the first envelope folding machine.[16] On June 12, 1880, Lee Richmond pitched the first perfect game in Major league baseball history for the Worcester Ruby Legs at the Worcester Agricultural Fairgrounds.[16]

American Steel & Wire Company, c. 1905, employer of about 5,000

On June 9, 1953 a F4 tornado touched down in Petersham, Massachusetts northwest of Worcester. The tornado tore through 48 miles of Worcester County including a large area of the city of Worcester. The tornado left massive destruction and killed 94 people. The Worcester Tornado would be the most deadly tornado to ever hit Massachusetts.[17] Debris from the tornado landed as far away as Dedham, Massachusetts.[18]

After World War II, Worcester began to fall into decline as the city lost its manufacturing base to cheaper alternatives across the country and overseas. Worcester felt the national trends of movement away from historic urban centers. The city’s population would drop over 20% from 1950 to 1980. In the mid-20th century large urban renewal projects were undertaken to try and reverse the city’s decline. A huge area of downtown Worcester was demolished for new office towers and the 1,000,000 sq. ft. Worcester Center Galleria shopping mall.[19] After only 30 years the Galleria would lose most of its major tenants and lose its appeal to more suburban shopping malls around Worcester County. In the 1960s, Interstate 290 was built right through the center of Worcester, permanently dividing the city. In 1963, Worcester native Harvey Ball introduced the iconic yellow smiley face to American culture.[20][21]

In the late 20th century Worcester’s economy began to recover as the city expanded into biotechnology and healthcare fields.[22] The UMass Medical School has become a leader in biomedical research and the Massachusetts Biotechnology Research Park has become a center of medical research and development.[22]Worcester hospitals Saint Vincent Hospital and UMass Memorial Health Care have become two of the largest employers in the city. Worcester’s many colleges, including the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Clark University, UMass Medical School, Assumption College, MCPHS University, Becker College, and Worcester State University, attract many students to the area and help drive the new economy.

The Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts reopened in Franklin Square in 2008

On December 3, 1999 a homeless man and his girlfriend accidentally started a five-alarm fire at the Worcester Cold Storage & Warehouse Company. The fire took the lives of six firemen and drew national attention as one of the worst firefighting tragedies in the late 20th century.[23]President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore and other local and national dignitaries attended the funeral service and memorial program in Worcester.[23]

In recent decades, a renewed interest in the city’s downtown has brought new investment and construction to Worcester. A Convention Center was built along the DCU Center arena in downtown Worcester in 1997.[24] In 2000, Worcester’s Union Station reopened after 25 years of neglect and a $32 million renovation. Hanover Insurance helped fund a multimillion-dollar renovation to the old Franklin Square Theater into the Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts.[25] In 2000, the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences built a new campus in downtown Worcester.[26] In 2007 WPI opened the first facility in their new Gateway Park center in Lincoln Square.[27] In 2004, Berkeley Investments proposed demolishing the old Worcester Center Galleria for a new mixed-used development called City Square. The ambitious project looked to reconnect old street patterns while creating a new retail, commercial and living destination in the city.[28] After struggling to secure finances for a number of years Hanover Insurance took over the project and demolition began on September 13, 2010. Unum Insurance and the Saint Vincent Hospital leased into the project and both facilities opened in 2013. The new Front Street opened on December 31, 2012.[29]

Geography[edit]

Worcester has a total area 38.6 square miles (100 km2). 37.6 square miles (97 km2) of it is land and 1.0 square mile (2.6 km2) (roughly 2.59%) is water. Worcester is bordered by the towns of Auburn, Grafton, Holden, Leicester, Millbury, Paxton, Shrewsbury, and West Boylston.

Worcester is known as the Heart of the Commonwealth, because of its proximity to the center of Massachusetts. The city is about 45 miles (72 km) west of Boston, 40 miles (64 km) east of Springfield, and 38 miles (61 km) northwest of Providence, Rhode Island.

The Blackstone River forms in the center of Worcester by the confluence of the Middle River and Mill Brook. The river courses underground through the center of the city, and emerges at the foot of College Hill. It then flows south through Quinsigamond Village and into Millbury. Worcester is the beginning of the Blackstone Valley that frames the river. The Blackstone Canal was once an important waterway connecting Worcester to Providence and the Eastern Seaboard, but the canal fell into disuse at the end of the 19th century and was mostly covered up. In recent years, local organizations including the Canal District Business Association have proposed restoring the canal and creating a Blackstone Valley National Park.[30]

Worcester is one of many cities claimed, like Rome, to be found on seven hills: Airport Hill, Bancroft Hill, Belmont Hill (Bell Hill), Grafton Hill, Green Hill, Pakachoag Hill and Vernon Hill. However, Worcester has more than seven hills including Indian Hill, Newton Hill, Poet’s Hill, and Wigwam Hill.

Worcester has many ponds and two prominent lakes: Indian Lake and Lake Quinsigamond. Lake Quinsigamond (also known as Long Pond) stretches four miles across the Worcester and Shrewsbury border and is a very popular competitive rowing and boating destination.

Climate[edit]

Worcester’s humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb) is typical of New England. The weather changes rapidly owing to the confluence of warm, humid air from the southwest; cool, dry air from the north; and the moderating influence of the Atlantic Ocean to the east. Summers are typically warm and humid, while winters are cold, windy, and snowy. Snow typically falls from the second half of November into early April,[31] with occasional falls in October; May snow is much rarer. The USDA classifies the city as straddling hardiness zones5b and 6a.[32]

The hottest month is July, with a 24-hour average of 70.2 °F (21.2 °C), while the coldest is January, at 24.1 °F (−4.4 °C). There is an average of only 3.5 days of 90 °F (32 °C)+ highs and 4.1 nights of lows at or below 0 °F (−18 °C) per year, and periods of both extremes are rarely sustained. The all-time record high temperature is 102 °F (39 °C), recorded on July 4, 1911,[33] the only 100 °F (38 °C) or greater temperature to date. The all-time record low temperature is −24 °F (−31 °C), recorded on February 16, 1943.[34]

The city averages 48.1 inches (1,220 mm) of precipitation a year, as well as an average of 64.1 inches (163 cm) of snowfall a season, receiving far more snow than coastal locations less than 40 miles (64 km) away. Massachusetts’ geographic location, jutting out into the North Atlantic, makes the city very prone to Nor’easter weather systems that can dump heavy snow on the region.

While rare, the city has had its share of extreme weather. On September 21, 1938, the city was hit by the brutal New England Hurricane of 1938. Fifteen years later, Worcester was hit by a tornado that killed 94 people. The deadliest tornado in New England history, it damaged a large part of the city and surrounding towns. It struck Assumption Preparatory School, now the site of Quinsigamond Community College.

[hide]Climate data for Worcester, Massachusetts (Worcester Regional Airport), 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1892–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 67
(19)
67
(19)
84
(29)
91
(33)
94
(34)
98
(37)
102
(39)
99
(37)
99
(37)
91
(33)
79
(26)
72
(22)
102
(39)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 52.9
(11.6)
53.8
(12.1)
66.3
(19.1)
78.2
(25.7)
84.1
(28.9)
87.5
(30.8)
89.5
(31.9)
88.1
(31.2)
83.7
(28.7)
74.7
(23.7)
66.7
(19.3)
56.7
(13.7)
91.2
(32.9)
Average high °F (°C) 31.3
(−0.4)
34.6
(1.4)
42.9
(6.1)
55.1
(12.8)
65.9
(18.8)
74.1
(23.4)
78.9
(26.1)
77.3
(25.2)
69.6
(20.9)
58.3
(14.6)
47.6
(8.7)
36.3
(2.4)
56.0
(13.3)
Average low °F (°C) 16.8
(−8.4)
19.4
(−7)
26.5
(−3.1)
37.0
(2.8)
46.8
(8.2)
56.0
(13.3)
61.5
(16.4)
60.4
(15.8)
52.9
(11.6)
41.7
(5.4)
33.0
(0.6)
22.6
(−5.2)
39.6
(4.2)
Mean minimum °F (°C) −2.3
(−19.1)
1.5
(−16.9)
8.1
(−13.3)
24.4
(−4.2)
35.6
(2)
44.1
(6.7)
52.3
(11.3)
49.7
(9.8)
39.2
(4)
28.6
(−1.9)
17.6
(−8)
4.3
(−15.4)
−4.6
(−20.3)
Record low °F (°C) −19
(−28)
−24
(−31)
−6
(−21)
9
(−13)
27
(−3)
33
(1)
41
(5)
38
(3)
27
(−3)
19
(−7)
3
(−16)
−17
(−27)
−24
(−31)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.49
(88.6)
3.23
(82)
4.21
(106.9)
4.11
(104.4)
4.19
(106.4)
4.19
(106.4)
4.23
(107.4)
3.71
(94.2)
3.93
(99.8)
4.68
(118.9)
4.28
(108.7)
3.82
(97)
48.07
(1,220.7)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 17.1
(43.4)
15.6
(39.6)
11.4
(29)
2.8
(7.1)
trace 0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(0.5)
2.6
(6.6)
14.4
(36.6)
64.1
(162.8)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 12.5 10.5 12.9 12.4 13.6 12.3 10.9 10.1 9.9 10.5 11.6 12.2 139.4
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 8.5 7.0 6.0 1.6 0 0 0 0 0 0.2 1.4 7.0 31.7
Source: NOAA[31][35][36]

Neighborhoods[edit]

Gallery[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 2,095
1800 2,411 15.1%
1810 2,577 6.9%
1820 2,962 14.9%
1830 4,173 40.9%
1840 7,497 79.7%
1850 17,049 127.4%
1860 24,960 46.4%
1870 41,105 64.7%
1880 58,291 41.8%
1890 84,655 45.2%
1900 118,421 39.9%
1910 145,986 23.3%
1920 179,754 23.1%
1930 195,311 8.7%
1940 193,694 −0.8%
1950 203,486 5.1%
1960 186,587 −8.3%
1970 176,572 −5.4%
1980 161,799 −8.4%
1990 169,759 4.9%
2000 172,648 1.7%
2010 181,045 4.9%
Est. 2015 184,815 [37] 2.1%
source:[38]

Successive waves of immigrants have in the past formed coherent ethnic enclaves, some of which continue to contribute to the rich ethnic texture of Worcester today. Swedessettled in Quinsigamond Village and Greendale, Italians settled along Shrewsbury Street, Irish and Poles settled around Kelley Square, Lithuanians settled on Vernon Hill, and Jews built their first synagogues on Green Island and Union Hill. The African-American community has existed since colonial times. Since the late 19th century, Grafton Hill and Vernon Hill have been points of entry for immigrants from all over the world: Irish, Italians, Lithuanians, Poles, Syrians, Lebanese, Indians, Puerto Ricans, French Canadians, and more recently, Albanians and Brazilians. Other prominent groups include Congolese, Russians, Armenians, Vietnamese, Liberians, Ghanaians and Greeks.

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, Worcester had a population of 181,045, of which 88,150 (48.7%) were male and 92,895 (51.3%) were female. In terms of age, 77.9% were over 18 years old and 11.7% were over 65 years old; the median age is 33.4 years. The median age for males is 32.1 years and 34.7 years for females.

In terms of race and ethnicity, Worcester’s population was 69.4% White, 11.6% Black or African American, 0.4% American Indian and Alaska Native, 6.1% Asian (3.0% Vietnamese, 0.9% Chinese, and 0.8% Asian Indian), <0.1% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, 8.4% from Some Other Race, and 4.0% from Two or More Races (1.2% White and Black or African American; 1.0% White and Some Other Race). Hispanics and Latinos of any race made up 20.9% of the population (12.7% Puerto Rican).[39] Non-Hispanic Whites were 59.6% of the population in 2010,[40] down from 96.8% in 1970.[41]

Income[edit]

Data is from the 2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.[42][43][44]

Rank ZIP Code (ZCTA) Per capita
income
Median
household
income
Median
family
income
Population Number of
households
Massachusetts $35,763 $66,866 $84,900 6,605,058 2,530,147
1 01606 $32,781 $66,912 $86,452 19,495 8,032
Worcester County $31,537 $65,223 $81,519 802,688 299,663
2 01602 $31,101 $62,832 $77,807 23,707 9,025
United States $28,155 $53,046 $64,719 311,536,594 115,610,216
3 01604 $27,119 $49,797 $54,984 34,720 14,388
Worcester $24,330 $45,932 $57,704 181,901 68,850
4 01607 $24,044 $45,152 $56,815 8,957 3,602
5 01609 $23,846 $40,660 $60,867 21,178 7,183
6 01603 $22,315 $48,183 $55,000 19,385 7,243
7 01605 $21,639 $37,705 $40,710 27,279 10,640
8 01610 $14,040 $30,532 $35,372 23,964 7,453
9 01608 $11,315 $19,418 $19,727 3,558 1,455

Government[edit]

County-level state agency heads
Clerk of Courts: Dennis P. McManus (D)
District Attorney: Joseph D. Early, Jr. (D)
Register of Deeds: Anthony J. Vigliotti (D)
Register of Probate: Stephanie K. Fattman (R)
County Sheriff: Lew Evangelidis (R)
State government
State Representative(s): James O’Day (D)Kate Campanale (R)
Dan Donahue (D)
John Mahoney (D)
Mary Keefe (D)
State Senator(s): Michael Moore (D)
Harriet L. Chandler (D)
Governor’s Councilor(s): Jen Caissie (R)
Federal government
U.S. Representative(s): James P. McGovern (D-2nd District),
U.S. Senators: Elizabeth Warren (D), Ed Markey (D)

Worcester is governed by a Council-manager government with a popularly elected mayor. A city council acts as the legislative body, and the council-appointed manager handles the traditional day-to-day chief executive functions.

City councilors can run as either a representative of a city district or as an at-large candidate. The winning at-large candidate who receives the greatest number of votes for mayor becomes the mayor (at-large councilor candidates must ask to be removed from the ballot for mayor if they do not want to be listed on the mayoral ballot). As a result, voters must vote for their mayoral candidate twice, once as an at-large councilor, and once as the mayor. The mayor has no more authority than other city councilors, but is the ceremonial head of the city and chair of the city council and school committee. Currently, there are 11 councilors: 6 at-large and 5 district.

Worcester’s first charter, which went into effect in 1848, established a Mayor/Bicameral form of government. Together, the two chambers — the 11-member Board of Aldermen and the 30-member Common Council — were vested with complete legislative powers. The mayor handled all administrative departments, though appointments to those departments had to be approved by the two-chamber City Council.

Seeking to replace the 1848 charter, Worcester voters in November 1947 approved a change to Plan E municipal government. In effect from January 1949 until November 1985, this charter (as outlined in chapter 43 of the Massachusetts General Laws) established City Council/City Manager government. This type of governance, with modifications, has survived to the present day.

Initially, Plan E government in Worcester was organized as a 9-member council (all at-large), a ceremonial mayor elected from the council by the councilors, and a council-appointed city manager. The manager oversees the daily administration of the city, makes all appointments to city offices, and can be removed at any time by a majority vote of the Council. The mayor chairs the city council and the school committee, and does not have the power to veto any vote.[45]

Downtown Worcester, with City Hall(1898) at right

In 1983, Worcester voters again decided to change the city charter. This “Home Rule” charter (named for the method of adoption of the charter) is similar to Plan E, the major changes being to the structure of the council and the election of the mayor. The 9-member Council became 11, 6 at-large and 1 from each city district. The mayor is chosen by popular election, but must also run and win as an at-large councilor.

Politics[edit]

Massachusetts Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial, erected in 2002

Lincoln Square c. 1912

Worcester’s history of social progressivism includes a number of temperance and abolitionist movements. It was a leader in the women’s suffrage movement: The first national convention advocating women’s rights was held in Worcester, October 23–24, 1850.[46]

Two of the nation’s most radical abolitionists, Abby Kelley Foster and her husband Stephen S. Foster, adopted Worcester as their home, as did Thomas Wentworth Higginson, the editor of The Atlantic Monthly and Emily Dickinson‘s avuncular correspondent, and Unitarian minister Rev. Edward Everett Hale.

The area was already home to Lucy Stone, Eli Thayer, and Samuel May, Jr. They were joined in their political activities by networks of related Quaker families such as the Earles and the Chases, whose organizing efforts were crucial to the anti-slavery cause in central Massachusetts and throughout New England.

Anarchist Emma Goldman and two others opened an ice cream shop in 1892. “It was spring and not yet warm,” Goldman later wrote, “but the coffee I brewed, our sandwiches, and dainty dishes were beginning to be appreciated. Within a short time we were able to invest in a soda-water fountain and some lovely coloured dishes.”[47]

On October 19, 1924, the largest gathering of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) ever held in New England took place at the Agricultural Fairgrounds in Worcester. Klansmen in sheets and hoods, new Knights awaiting a mass induction ceremony, and supporters swelled the crowd to 15,000. The KKK had hired more than 400 “husky guards”, but when the rally ended around midnight, a riot broke out. Klansmen’s cars were stoned and burned, and their windows smashed. KKK members were pulled from their cars and beaten. Klansmen called for police protection, but the situation raged out of control for most of the night. The violence after the “Klanvocation” had the desired effect: Membership fell off, and no further public Klan meetings were held in Worcester[citation needed].

Robert Stoddard, owner of The Telegram and Gazette, was one of the founders of the John Birch Society.

Sixties era radical Abbie Hoffman was born in Worcester in 1936 and spent more than half of his life there.

Voter registration and party enrollment as of August 20, 2014 – Worcester[48]
Party Number of voters Percentage
Democratic 47,275 44%
Republican 9,310 9%
Unenrolled 50,397 47%
Political Designations 0 0%
Total 107,686 100%

Public safety[edit]

For public safety needs, the City of Worcester is protected by both the Worcester Fire Department and the Worcester Police Department.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are provided by UMass Memorial Medical Center under contract with the city. Originally operated by Worcester City Hospital and later by the University of Massachusetts Medical School, “Worcester EMS” operates exclusively at the advanced life support (ALS) level, with two paramedics staffing each ambulance. UMass Memorial EMS maintains two community EMS stations and operates a fleet of 18 ambulances, as well as a special-operations trailer, several other support vehicles, and a bike team. The agency responds to over 32,000 calls for medical assistance annually. UMass Memorial EMS operates the EMS Communications Center, which is a secondary PSAP and provides emergency medical dispatch (EMD) services to Worcester and other communities.

Economy[edit]

By the mid-19th century Worcester was one of the largest manufacturing centers in New England. The city’s large industries specialized in machinery, wire production, and power looms. And although manufacturing has largely declined, the city still maintains large manufactures, like Norton Abrasives, which was bought by Saint-Gobain in 1990, Morgan Construction and the David Clark Company. The David Clark Companypioneered aeronautical equipment including anti-gravity suits and noise attenuating headsets.

The Hanover Insurance Group

Services, particularly education and healthcare make up a large portion of the city’s economy. Worcester’s many colleges and universities make higher education a considerable presence in the city’s economy. Hanover Insurance was founded in 1852 and retains its headquarters in Worcester. Unum Insurance and Fallon Community Health Plan have offices in the city. Polar Beverages is the largest independent soft-drink bottler in the country and is located in Worcester.

University of Massachusetts Medical School‘s Lazare Research Building

The biotechnology and technology industries have helped spur major expansions at both the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The Massachusetts Biotechnology Research Park hosts many innovative companies including Advanced Cell Technology and Abbott Laboratories. The Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology located in nearby Shrewsbury developed the oral contraceptive pill in 1951.

Downtown Worcester used to boast major Boston retailers Filene’s and Jordan Marsh as well Worcester’s own department stores Barnard’s and Denholm & McKay. Over time most retailers moved away from downtown and into the suburban Auburn Mall and Greendale Mall in North Worcester.

In 2010,[49] the median household income was $61,212. Median income for the family was $76,485. The per capita income was $29,316. About 7.7% of families and 10.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.1% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over. In October 2013, Worcester was found to be the number five city for investing in a rental property.[50]

Top employers[edit]

According to the City’s 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[51] the top ten employers in the city are:

# Employer # of employees
1 UMass Memorial Health Care 13,764
2 University of Massachusetts Medical School 5,678
3 City of Worcester 5,128
4 Saint Vincent Hospital 2,386
5 Hanover Insurance 1,850
6 Saint-Gobain 1,807
7 Reliant Medical Group 1,801
8 Polar Beverages 1,400
9 College of the Holy Cross 1,107
10 Quinsigamond Community College 900

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary education[edit]

Worcester’s public schools educate more than 23,000 students in kindergarten through 12th grade.[52] The system consists of 33 elementary schools, 4 middle schools, 7 high schools,[53] and 13 other learning centers such as magnet schools, alternative schools, and special education schools. The city’s public school system also administers an adult education component called “Night Life”, and operates a Public-access television cable TV station on channel 11.

The Massachusetts Academy of Math and Science was founded in 1992 as a public secondary school located at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

One notable charter school in the city is Abby Kelley Foster Charter Public School, which teaches kindergarten through 12th grade. It is granted status by Massachusetts as a Level 1 school. It is the one of 834 schools in the United States to offer the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme.

Worcester Technical High School, or Worcester Tech.’s graduating class of 2014 was honored by having president Barack Obama as the speaker at their graduation ceremony. Their principal, Sheila Harrity, was awarded the national title of Principal of the Year by NASSP.

Twenty-one private and parochial schools are also found throughout Worcester, including the city’s oldest educational institution, Worcester Academy, founded in 1834, and Bancroft School, founded in 1900.

The most known public schools include North High School, South High School, Doherty High School, Abby Kelley Foster, Worcester Technical High School and Burncoat High School.

Higher education[edit]

Boynton Hall, 1868, designed by Worcester architect Stephen Earle, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Warner Memorial Theater, opened 1932, designed by Drew Eberson, Worcester Academy

Worcester is home to several institutes of higher education.

  • Assumption College is the fourth oldest Roman Catholic college in New England and was founded in 1904. At 175 acres (0.71 km2), it has the largest campus in Worcester.
  • Becker College is a private college with campuses in Worcester and Leicester, Massachusetts. It was founded in Leicester in 1784 as Leicester Academy. The Worcester campus was founded in 1887, and the two campuses merged into Becker College in 1977. Becker’s video game design program has consistently been ranked in the top 10 in the U.S. and Canada.[54]
  • Clark University was founded in 1887 as the first all-graduate school in the country; it now also educates undergraduates and is noted for its strengths in psychology and geography. Its first president was G. Stanley Hall, the founder of organized psychology as a science and profession, father of the child study movement, and founder of the American Psychological Association. Well-known professors include Albert A. Michelson, who won the first American Nobel Prize in 1902 for his measurement of light. Robert H. Goddard, a pioneering rocket scientist of the space age also studied and taught here, and, in his only visit to the United States, Sigmund Freud delivered his five famous “Clark Lectures” at the university. Clark offers the only program in the country leading to a Ph.D. in Holocaust History and Genocide Studies.
  • The Jesuit College of the Holy Cross, was founded in 1843 and is the oldest Roman Catholic college in New England and one of the oldest in the United States. Well-known graduates include Dr. Joseph E. Murray, Nobel laureate in Physiology or Medicine, Billy Collins, former Poet Laureate of the United States, Bob Cousy, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. In 2013, the College of the Holy Cross was ranked by U.S. News and World Report as the nation’s 25th highest-rated liberal arts college.[55]
  • The Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Worcester Campus houses the institution’s Doctor of Optometry program, accelerated programs in Nursing and Doctor of Pharmacy, Master’s program New England School of Acupuncture, as well as the Master’s program in Physician Assistant Studies for post-baccalaureate students.
  • Quinsigamond Community College.
  • The University of Massachusetts Medical School (1970) is one of the nation’s top 50 medical schools. Dr. Craig Mello won the 2006 Nobel Prize for Medicine. The University of Massachusetts Medical School is ranked fourth in primary care education among America’s 125 medical schools in the 2006 U.S. News & World Report annual guide “America’s Best Graduate Schools”.[56]
  • Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1865) is an innovative leader in engineering education and partnering with local biotechnology industries. Robert Goddard, the father of modern rocketry, graduated from WPI in 1908 with a Bachelor of Science in physics.
  • Worcester State University is a public, 4-year college founded in 1874 as Worcester Normal School.

An early higher education institution, the Oread Institute, closed in 1934.

Many of these institutions participate in the Colleges of Worcester Consortium. This independent, non-profit collegiate association includes academic institutions in Worcester and other communities in Worcester County, such as Anna Maria College in neighboring Paxton. It facilitates cooperation among the colleges and universities. One example of this being its inter-college shuttle bus and student cross registration.

Other programs[edit]

Worcester is the home of Dynamy, a “residential internship program” in the United States.[57] The organization was founded in 1969.

Culture[edit]

Mechanics Hall concert

Bancroft Tower stands atop Bancroft Hill and was erected in 1900 by Stephen Salisbury III in honor of his childhood friendship with George Bancroft.[58]

Much of Worcester culture is synonymous with Boston and New England culture. The city’s name is notoriously mispronounced by people unfamiliar with the city. As with the city in England, the first syllable of “cester” (castra) is left entirely unvoiced. Combined with a predominantly non-rhotic version of a New England accent, the name can be transcribed in General American as WOOS-tah or WISS-tah; see close central unrounded vowel.[59]

Worcester has many traditionally ethnic neighborhoods, including Quinsigamond Village (Swedish), Shrewsbury Street (Italian) Kelley Square (Irish and Polish) Vernon Hill (Lithuanian) and Union Hill (Jewish).

Shrewsbury Street is Worcester’s traditional “Little Italy” neighborhood and today boasts many of the city’s most popular restaurants and nightlife.[60] The Canal District was once an old eastern European neighborhood, but has been redeveloped into a very popular bar, restaurant and club scene.[61] Worcester is also famously the former home of the Worcester Lunch Car Company. The company began in 1906 and built many famous lunch car diners in New England. Worcester is home to many classic lunch car diners including Boulevard Diner, Corner Lunch, Chadwick Square Diner, and Miss Worcester Diner.

There are also many dedicated community organizations and art associations located in the city. stART on the Street is an annual festival promoting local art. The Worcester Music Festival and New England Metal and Hardcore Festival are also held annually in Worcester. The Worcester County St. Patrick’s Parade runs through Worcester and is one of the largest St. Patrick’s Daycelebrations in the state. The city also hosts the second oldest First Night celebration in the country each New Year’s Eve.

Worcester is also the state’s largest center for the arts outside of Boston. Mechanics Hall, built in 1857, is one of the oldest concert halls in the country and is renowned for its pure acoustics.[62] In 2008 the old Poli Palace Theatre reopened as the Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts.[63] The theatre brings many Broadway shows and nationally recognized performers to the city. Tuckerman Hall, designed by one of the country’s earliest woman architects, Josephine Wright Chapman, is home to the Massachusetts Symphony Orchestra. The DCU Center arena and convention holds many large concerts, exhibitions and conventions in the city. The Worcester County Poetry Association sponsors readings by national and local poets in the city and the Worcester Center for Crafts provides craft education and skills to the community. Worcester is also home to the Worcester Youth Orchestras.[64] Founded in 1947 by Harry Levenson, it is the 3rd oldest youth orchestra in the country and regularly performs at Mechanics Hall.

The nickname Wormtown is synonymous with the city’s once large underground rock music scene. The nickname has now become used to refer to the city itself.[65][66][67]

Sites of interest[edit]

Elm Park Iron Bridge Worcester Massachusetts

The Elm Park Iron Bridge Worcester Massachusetts

Worcester has 1,200 acres of publicly owned property. Notable parks include Elm Park, which was laid out by Frederick Law Olmsted in 1854, and the City Common laid out in 1669. Both parks are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[68] The largest park in the city is the 549 acre Green Hill Park. The park was donated by the Green family in 1903 and includes the Green Hill Park Shelter built in 1910. In 2002, the Massachusetts Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Green Hill Park. Other Parks, include Newton Hill, East Park, Morgan Park, Shore Park, Crompton Park, Hadwen Park, Institute Park and University Park. As a former manufacturing center, Worcester has many historic 19th century buildings and on the National Register of Historic Places, including the old facilities of the Crompton Loom Works, Ashworth and Jones Factory and Worcester Corset Company Factory.

The Burnside Fountain, also known as the Turtle Boy statue is a local landmark located on the Worcester Common

The American Antiquarian Society has been located in Worcester since 1812. The national library and society has one of the largest collections of early American history in the world. The city’s main museum is the Worcester Art Museum established in 1898. The museum is the second largest art museum in New England, behind the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.[69] From 1931 to 2013, Worcester was home to the Higgins Armory Museum, which was the sole museum dedicated to arms and armor in the country.[70] Its collection and endowment were transferred and integrated into the Worcester Art Museum, with the collection to be shown in a new gallery slated to open in 2015. The non-profit Veterans Inc. is headquartered at the southern tip of Grove Street in the historic Massachusetts National Guard Armory building.

The Worcester Memorial Auditorium is one of the most prominent buildings in the city. Built as a World War I war memorial in 1933, the multipurpose auditorium has hosted many of the Worcester’s most famous concerts and sporting events.

Sports[edit]

Worcester was home to Marshall Walter (“Major”) Taylor, an African American cyclist who won the world one-mile (1.6 km) track cycling championship in 1899. Taylor’s legacy is being the second black world champion in any sport. Taylor was nicknamed the Worcester Whirlwind by the local papers.

The College of the Holy Cross‘ football team (purple)

Lake Quinsigamond is home to the Eastern Sprints, a premier rowing event in the United States. Competitive rowing teams first came to Lake Quinsigamond in 1857. Finding the long, narrow lake ideal for such crew meets, avid rowers established boating clubs on the lake’s shores, the first being the Quinsigamond Boating Club. More boating clubs and races followed, and soon many colleges (local, national, and international) held regattas, such as the Eastern Sprints, on the lake. Beginning in 1895, local high schools held crew races on the lake. In 1952, the lake played host to the National Olympic rowing trials.

In 2002, the Jesse Burkett Little League all-stars team went all the way to the Little League World Series. They made it to the US final before losing to Owensboro, Kentucky. Jesse Burkett covers the West Side area of Worcester, along with Ted Williams Little League.

The city will host Worcester Railers HC of the ECHL, which will begin play in October 2017. Prior to the Railers, the American Hockey League team Worcester Sharks played in Worcester from 2006 to 2015, before relocating to San Jose. The Sharks played at the DCU Center as a developmental team for the National Hockey League‘s San Jose Sharks. The AHL was formerly represented by the Worcester IceCats from 1994 to 2005. The IceCats were chiefly affiliated with the St. Louis Blues.

The city’s former professional baseball team, the Worcester Tornadoes, started in 2005 and was a member of the Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball League. The team played at the Hanover Insurance Park at Fitton Field on the campus of the College of the Holy Cross and was not affiliated with any major league team. The team’s owner ran into financial difficulties, and the team disbanded after the 2012 season. The Worcester Bravehearts began play in 2014 as the local affiliate of the Futures Collegiate Baseball League, and won the league championship in their inaugural season. The New England Surge, a member of the Continental Indoor Football League, played their home games in the DCU Center in their two years of existence, 2007 and 2008. Candlepin bowling was invented in Worcester in 1880 by Justin White, an area bowling alley owner. The Worcester County Wildcats are part of the New England Football League, is a semi-pro football team, and play at Commerce Bank Field at Foley Stadium.

Golf‘s Ryder Cup‘s first official tournament was played at the Worcester Country Club in 1927. The course also hosted the U.S. Open in 1925, and the U.S. Women’s Open in 1960.

Worcester’s colleges have long histories and many notable achievements in collegiate sports. The College of the Holy Cross represents NCAA Division 1 sports in Worcester. The other colleges and Universities in Worcester correspond with division II and III. The Holy Cross Crusaders won the NCAA men’s basketball champions in 1947 and NIT men’s basketball champions in 1954, led by future NBA hall-of-famers and Boston Celtic legends Bob Cousy and Tom Heinsohn.

Religion[edit]

The Unitarian-Universalist Church of Worcester was founded in 1841. Worcester’s Greek Orthodox Cathedral, St. Spyridon, was founded in 1924.

Worcester is home to a dedicated Jewish population, who attend five synagogues, including Reform congregation Temple Emanuel Sinai, Congregation Beth Israel, a Conservative synagogue founded in 1924,[71] and Orthodox Congregation Tifereth Israel – Sons of Jacob (Chabad), home of Yeshiva Achei Tmimim Academy. Beth Israel and its rabbi were the subject of the book And They Shall be My People: An American Rabbi and His Congregation by Paul Wilkes.

The first Armenian Church in America was built in Worcester in 1890 and consecrated on January 18, 1891 as “Soorp Purgich” (Holy Saviour). The current sanctuary of the congregation, known now as Armenian Church of Our Savior was consecrated in 1952.

The first Catholics came to Worcester in 1826. They were chiefly Irish immigrants brought to America by the builders of the Blackstone canal. As time went on and the number of Catholics increased, the community petitioned Bishop Fenwick to send them a priest. In response to this appeal, the bishop appointed the Reverend James Fitton to visit the Catholics of Worcester in 1834. Catholic mass was first offered in the city in an old stone building on Front street. The foundation of Christ’s Church, the first Catholic church in Worcester (now St. John’s), was laid on July 6, 1834.[72]

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Worcester was canonically erected on January 14, 1950, by Pope Pius XII. Its territories were taken from the neighboring Diocese of Springfield. The current and fifth bishop is Robert Joseph McManus.[73]

Media[edit]

The Telegram & Gazette is Worcester’s only daily newspaper. The paper, known locally as “the Telegram” or “the T and G”, is wholly owned by GateHouse Media of Fairport, New York.[74] WCTR, channel 3, is Worcester’s local news television station, and WUNI-TV, channel 27, is the only major over-the-air broadcast television station in Worcester. Radio stations based in Worcester include WCHC, WCUW, WSRS, WTAG, WWFX, WICN and WXLO. WCCA-TV Shows on channel 194 and provides Community Cable-Access Television as well as a live stream of the channel on their website WCCATV.com.[75]

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Worcester is served by several interstate highways. Interstate 290 connects central Worcester to Interstate 495, I-90 in nearby Auburn, and I-395. I-190 links Worcester to MA 2 and the cities of Fitchburg and Leominster in northern Worcester County. I-90 can also be reached from a new Massachusetts Route 146 connector.

Worcester is also served by several smaller Massachusetts state highways. Route 9 links the city to its eastern and western suburbs, Shrewsbury and Leicester. Route 9 runs almost the entire length of the state, connecting Boston and Worcester with Pittsfield, near the New York state border. Route 12 was the primary route north to Leominster and Fitchburg until the completion of I-190. Route 12 also connected Worcester to Webster before I-395 was completed. It still serves as an alternate, local route. Route 146, the Worcester-Providence Turnpike, connects the city with the similar city of Providence, Rhode Island. Route 20 touches the southernmost tip of Worcester near the Massachusetts Turnpike. U.S. 20 is a coast-to-coast route connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, and is the longest road in the United States.[76]

Union Station, 1911, designed by Watson & Huckel of Philadelphia

Worcester is the headquarters of the Providence and Worcester, a Class II railroad operating throughout much of southern New England. Worcester is also the western terminus of the Framingham/Worcester commuter rail line run by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. Union Station serves as the hub for commuter railway traffic. Built in 1911, the station has been restored to its original grace and splendor, reopening to full operation in 2000. It also serves as an Amtrak stop, serving the Lake Shore Limited from Boston to Chicago. In October 2008 the MBTA added 5 new trains to the Framingham/Worcester line as part of a plan to add 20 or more trains from Worcester to Boston and also to buy the track from CSX Transportation.[77] Train passengers may also connect to additional services such as the Vermonter line in Springfield.

The Worcester Regional Transit Authority, or WRTA, manages the municipal bus system. Buses operate intracity as well as connect Worcester to surrounding central Massachusetts communities. The WRTA also operates a shuttle bus between member institutions of the Colleges of Worcester Consortium. Worcester is also served by Peter Pan Bus Lines and Greyhound Bus Lines, which operate out of Union Station. MAX provides intercity bus service to Fitchburg and Brattleboro, Vermont with intermediate stops.[78]

The Worcester Regional Airport, owned and operated by Massport lies at the top of Tatnuck Hill, Worcester’s highest. The airport consists of one 7,000 ft (2,100 m) runway and a $15.7 million terminal. The airport held numerous airlines from the 1950s through the 1990s, but it has encountered years of spotty commercial flights. On September 4, 2008, Direct Air announced it would begin serving Worcester to Orlando, Florida, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and Punta Gorda, Florida, in the spring of 2009. On Tuesday March 13, 2012, Direct Air canceled its entire charter program (including service to Worcester) due to financial reasons, leaving the passenger terminal at Worcester Regional Airport empty.[79] In 2013, JetBlue announced that it would service ORH, and service began in November 2013.[80] It currently provides daily service from ORH to Fort Lauderdale, and Orlando, Florida.[81] Massport has announced plans to install a Category III landing system at ORH to combat takeoff and landing problems caused by routine fog at the airport.[82]

Healthcare[edit]

UMass-Worcester Medical School Hospital

The Worcester State Insane Asylum Hospital (1833) was the first hospital in the United States established to treat mental illnesses.[citation needed]

Worcester is home to the University of Massachusetts Medical School, ranked fourth in primary care education among America’s 125 medical schools in the 2006 U.S. News & World Report annual guide “America’s Best Graduate Schools”.[56] The medical school is in the top quartile of medical schools nationally in research funding from the NIH and is home to highly respected scientists including a Nobel laureate, a Lasker Award recipient and multiple members of the National Academy of Sciences and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The school is closely affiliated with UMass Memorial Health Care, the clinical partner of the medical school, which has expanded its locations all over Central Massachusetts. St. Vincent Hospital at Worcester Medical Center in the downtown area rounds out Worcester’s primary care facilities. Reliant Medical Group, formerly Fallon Clinic, is the largest private multi-specialty group in central Massachusetts with over 30 different specialties. It is affiliated with St. Vincent’s Hospital in downtown Worcester. Reliant Medical Group was the creator of Fallon Community Health Plan, a now independent HMO based in Worcester, and one of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the state.

Utilities and public services[edit]

Worcester has a municipally owned water supply. Sewage disposal services are provided by the Upper Blackstone Water Pollution Abatement District, which services Worcester as well as some surrounding communities. National Grid USA is the exclusive distributor of electric power to the city, though due to deregulation, customers now have a choice of electric generation companies. Natural gas is distributed by NSTAR Gas; only commercial and industrial customers may choose an alternate natural gas supplier. Verizon, successor to New England Telephone, NYNEX, and Bell Atlantic, is the primary wired telephone service provider for the area. Phone service is also available from various national wireless companies. Cable television is available from Charter Communications, with Broadband Internet access also provided, while a variety of DSL providers and resellers are able to provide broadband Internet over Verizon-owned phone lines.[citation needed]

Sister cities[edit]

Worcester has the following sister cities:[citation needed]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

^ a: The US Census estimated that Worcester surpassed Providence in 2006 by 199 people. Though this is well within the margin of error, List of United States cities by population uses the 2008 estimates for purposes of ranking. The New England article, however, ranks by 2000 Census, which places Providence as second largest. In the 2010 Census, Worcester’s roughly 181,000 residents surpassed Providence’s roughly 178,000.

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ How do you say ‘Worcester?’, archived from the original on May 4, 2015, retrieved August 1, 2015
  2. Jump up^ “Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Worcester city, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 6, 2013.
  3. Jump up^ The third largest city is Providence, Rhode Island, with a population of 178,042. “Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Providence city, Rhode Island”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 6, 2013.
  4. Jump up^ “Valentines weren’t invented in Worcester, but they have special history here”.
  5. Jump up^ Lincoln, William (1862). History of Worcester, Massachusetts, pp. 22-23. Worcester: Charles Hersey.
  6. ^ Jump up to:a b “Hassanamisco Indian Museum History”. Hassanamisco Indian Museum. 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  7. Jump up^ Worcester Society of Antiquity (1903). Exercises Held at the Dedication of a Memorial to Major Jonas Rice, the First Permanent Settler of Worcester, Massachusetts, Wednesday, October 7, 1903.Charles Hamilton Press, Worcester. 72pp.
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  9. Jump up^ Coombs, Zelotes W. “Worcester & Worcester Common”. City of Worcester, Massachusetts. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  10. Jump up^ American Antiquarian Society Fact Sheet
  11. Jump up^ “Transportation”. Worcester Historical Museum. 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  12. ^ Jump up to:a b Dan Ricciardi; Kathryn Mahoney (2013). “Washburn and Moen Worcester’s Worldwide Wire Manufacturuer”. College of the Holy Cross. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  13. Jump up^ “Three Deckers”. Worcester Historical Museum. 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  14. Jump up^ “Worcester, MA Driving Tour & Guide to Blackstone Canal Historic Markers”. Retrieved July 23, 2007.
  15. Jump up^ Gaultney, Bruce (2009). Worcester Memories, pp. 21. Early 1990s.
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  17. Jump up^ Gaultney, Bruce (2009). Worcester Memories, pp. 79. 1950s.
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  24. Jump up^ “Facility Info”. DCU Center. September 25, 2005.
  25. Jump up^ “Restoration”. Wrcester Center for the Performing Arts. 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  26. Jump up^ Brown, Matthew (April 28, 2010). “College of Pharmacy To Buy Crowne Plaza Property”. Worcester Business Journal. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  27. Jump up^ “Gateway Park at WPI”. Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  28. Jump up^ Kotsopoulos, Nick (March 17, 2010). “Hanover buys into CitySquare”. Worcester Telegram & Gazette. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  29. Jump up^ “Front St. connection planned by end of year in Worcester”. Worcester Telegram & Gazette. December 13, 2012. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  30. Jump up^ Jones-D’Agostino, Steven (September 3, 2013). “Worcester’s Canal District Banks On National Park Designation”. GoLocalWorcester. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
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  40. Jump up^ “Worcester (city), Massachusetts”. State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau.
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  47. Jump up^ American Experience | Emma Goldman | People & Events. PBS. Retrieved on July 15, 2013.
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  50. Jump up^ Novinson, Michael. ” Index: Central Mass. #5 in U.S. For Owning Rental Property.” Worcester Business Journal. October 8, 2013.
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Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Dentist in Mill River, Mass. 01244

doctor, dentist, dental

There are lots of Dentists in Massachusetts. In fact, they all have get admission to to fastened standards of coaching, techniques and information in regards to the recent building within the dental field. Alternatively, not all of them are good at what they do, and which means for those who occur to fall of their palms, you’re going to get mediocre products and services or no less than really feel so, thanks to the fact that every particular person has their own personalities and attitudes which won’t resonate well with all sufferers. However that’s additionally where we are available in whilst you talk about discovering the best dentist in Massachusetts. Find a dentist office near me.

We are pleasant and responsible

Our staff have a top stage of expertise in all dental spaces, plus we are dedicated and overly ambitious in our job. As a result of the fascinating personalities of our team individuals, patients have consistently built the feeling of agree with in our judgement. For some unexplained purposes, our shoppers have all the time depended on that we are the best in Massachusetts. They’ve at all times validated confidence that we’re the correct folks to wait to their dental wishes. However how do we be capable of maintain this courting with our clients? Find a dentist office near me.

Smartly, our workforce of dental practitioners is constructed from friendly and accountable staff participants who offer a streamlined appointment procedure, even as making sure that our interaction with patients is at all times pleasant and noteworthy. This manner, now we have managed to draw many clients to our sanatorium in Massachusetts, and we imagine that our friendliness and reputation as a whole discuss on our behalf.

We operate in a blank and modern place of job

Most people in the market dangle the belief that restaurant restrooms are a sign of kitchen cleanliness. Alternatively, the same can also be mentioned a couple of dentist’s office in Massachusetts. Because of this, we have invested in a clean and up to date place of business which is also supplied with up to date apparatus to help us do a neat job. Each client who walks through our doors end up feeling satisfied after understanding that we are without equal pros in relation to dental care and treatment. Find a dentist office near me.

We’re very a lot desirous about serving others

This can be very tough to search out dentists who are truly committed to serving others. A few people do it for the money and now not as it’s a calling. Alternatively, like some other business, the dental business is instantly evolving to adopt things that would not be related to dentists some 2 a long time in the past.

Our personnel members are liberating themselves up with the intention to commit their time to patient. We additionally center of attention on working with complex technology and coaching fabrics with the intention to offer the recent state of the art dental care throughout the higher area of Massachusetts. Our time and effort is directed against attending to patients, and thus handing over awesome affected person care is our no 1 goal.

Due to this fact, when most sufferers look for the best Dentist in Massachusetts, we often make the best candidate to select since we are very being concerned, understanding and social. This has allowed us to scale up our operation as a way to meet the rising needs of our sufferers. It is for that reason that you should almost definitely check out us and see what we need to offer.

New Marlborough, Massachusetts

New Marlborough, Massachusetts
Town
Entering New Marlborough - Inc. 1759

Entering New Marlborough – Inc. 1759
Official seal of New Marlborough, Massachusetts
Seal
Location in Berkshire County and the state of Massachusetts.
Location in Berkshire County and the state of Massachusetts.
Coordinates: 42°07′22″N 73°13′45″WCoordinates: 42°07′22″N 73°13′45″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Berkshire
Settled 1738
Incorporated 1759
Government
 • Type Open town meeting
Area
 • Total 47.9 sq mi (124.1 km2)
 • Land 46.9 sq mi (121.4 km2)
 • Water 1.0 sq mi (2.6 km2)
Elevation 1,351 ft (412 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,509
 • Density 32/sq mi (12.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01244
Area code(s) 413
FIPS code 25-45420
GNIS feature ID 0618272
Website www.newmarlboroughma.gov

New Marlborough is a town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, United States. It is part of the Pittsfield, Massachusetts Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,509 at the 2010 census.[1] New Marlborough consists of five villages: Clayton, Hartsville, Mill River, New Marlborough Village and Southfield.

History[edit]

New Marlborough was first settled in 1738 as one of the four townships opened along the road between Sheffield and Westfield. The town was officially incorporated in 1775, and presumably named for Marlborough, Massachusetts. The town grew as a combination of agriculture in the area around the town center, and mills along the rivers in town. Today it is mostly rural, with little industry.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 47.9 square miles (124.1 km2), of which 46.9 square miles (121.4 km2) is land and 1.0 square mile (2.6 km2), or 2.12%, is water.[1] New Marlborough is bordered on the north by Monterey, on the east by Sandisfield, on the south by Norfolk and North Canaan, Connecticut, on the west by Sheffield, and on the northwest by Great Barrington. New Marlborough is located 26 miles (42 km) south of Pittsfield, 42 miles (68 km) west of Springfield and 128 miles (206 km) west-southwest of Boston.

New Marlborough is located in the lower Berkshires, dotted by several peaks. Several rivers, including the Konkapot River, Umpachene River, and Whiting River, flow through the town, all of which feed into the Housatonic River. There are also several swamps and ponds, including Lake Buel on the Monterey line, and the Thousand Acre Swamp in the southeast corner. The swamp lies along the border of Campbells Falls State Park, named for the falls along the Whiting River. Parts of Sandisfield State Forest also lie in the town.

The town lies along Massachusetts Route 183, which passes from Lenox and Great Barrington towards Sandisfield and the Connecticut border. For the northern half of the route, Route 183 is combined with Route 57, which splits near the geographic center of town to head east towards Sandisfield and its eventual terminus in Agawam.

The nearest interstate, Interstate 90 (the Massachusetts Turnpike) passes several miles north of the town, with the nearest exit, Exit 2 in Lee, being 15 miles (24 km) away. The nearest bus service is in Great Barrington, and the nearest rail service (along the Lake Shore Line of Amtrak) is in Pittsfield. The nearest small airport is in Great Barrington, with the nearest national air service being at Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Connecticut.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1850 1,847
1860 1,782 −3.5%
1870 1,855 +4.1%
1880 1,876 +1.1%
1890 1,305 −30.4%
1900 1,282 −1.8%
1910 1,124 −12.3%
1920 1,010 −10.1%
1930 864 −14.5%
1940 956 +10.6%
1950 989 +3.5%
1960 1,083 +9.5%
1970 1,031 −4.8%
1980 1,160 +12.5%
1990 1,240 +6.9%
2000 1,494 +20.5%
2010 1,509 +1.0%
* = population estimate.
Source: United States Censusrecords and Population Estimates Programdata.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 1,494 people, 582 households, and 403 families residing in the town. By population, the town ranks 17th out of the 32 cities and towns in Berkshire County, and 307th out of the 351 cities and towns in Massachusetts. The population density was 31.7 people per square mile (12.2/km²), which ranks 23rd in the county and 329th in the Commonwealth. There were 963 housing units at an average density of 20.4 per square mile (7.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.52% White, 1.67% African American, 0.13% Asian, 0.13% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.14% of the population.

There were 582 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.1% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the town the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 106.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $46,875, and the median income for a family was $56,944. Males had a median income of $34,205 versus $25,972 for females. The per capita income for the town was $25,658. About 3.7% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

New Marlborough Town Hall

New Marlborough employs the open town meeting form of government, and is led by a board of selectmen and an executive assistant. The town has its own police, fire and public works departments. The town library, located in Mill River, is connected to the regional library network, and the town has two post offices, in Mill River and Southfield. The nearest hospital, Fairview Hospital, is in neighboring Great Barrington.

On the state level, New Marlborough is represented in the Massachusetts House of Representatives by the Fourth Berkshire district, which covers southern Berkshire County, as well as the westernmost towns in Hampden County. In the Massachusetts Senate, the town is represented by the Berkshire, Hampshire and Franklin district, which includes all of Berkshire County and western Hampshire and Franklin counties.[13] The town is patrolled by the First (Lee) Station of Barracks “B” of the Massachusetts State Police.[14]

On the national level, New Marlborough is represented in the United States House of Representatives as part of Massachusetts’s 1st congressional district, and has been represented by Richard Neal of Springfield since January 2013; it was previously represented by John Olver of Amherst between 1991 and 2013. Massachusetts is currently represented in the United States Senate by senators Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey.

Education[edit]

New Marlborough is one of five towns that operate the Southern Berkshire Regional School District (a sixth town, Mount Washington, also sends students to the district’s schools). Students attend the New Marlborough Central School from pre-kindergarten through fourth grades, while all students in the district attend Undermountain Elementary School in Sheffield for fifth and sixth grades, and Mount Everett Regional School in Sheffield for grades 7-12.[15] There are private schools in Great Barrington and other nearby towns.

The nearest community college is the South County Center of Berkshire Community College in Great Barrington. The nearest state college is Westfield State University. The nearest private college is Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington.

News[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b “Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): New Marlborough town, Berkshire County, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  2. Jump up^ “TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1”. American FactFinder, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts. United States Census Bureau. 2010.
  3. Jump up^ “Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision – GCT-T1. Population Estimates”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  4. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  5. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  6. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  7. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  8. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12,2011.
  9. Jump up^ “1870 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  10. Jump up^ “1860 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. Jump up^ “1850 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1854. Pages 338 through 393. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. Jump up^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  13. Jump up^ Senators and Representatives by City and Town
  14. Jump up^ Station B-1, SP Lee
  15. Jump up^ Southern Berkshire Regional School District homepage

External links[edit]

Dentist in North Carver, Mass. 02355

doctor, dentist, dental

There are many Dentists in Massachusetts. In reality, they all have access to fastened requirements of coaching, tactics and data concerning the up to date construction within the dental field. Alternatively, now not they all are excellent at what they do, and which means if you happen to happen to fall of their fingers, you will get mediocre products and services or no less than really feel so, thanks to the fact that each individual has their own personalities and attitudes which won’t resonate well with all patients. But that’s also the place we come in when you discuss discovering the best dentist in Massachusetts. Find a dentist office near me.

We are friendly and accountable

Our staff have a high level of experience in all dental spaces, plus we are dedicated and overly formidable in our job. As a result of the charming personalities of our workforce contributors, patients have constantly built the feeling of agree with in our judgement. For a few unexplained purposes, our clients have all the time relied on that we’re the most productive in Massachusetts. They have always tested confidence that we’re the fitting folks to attend to their dental needs. However how do we be able to deal with this courting with our shoppers? Find a dentist office near me.

Smartly, our staff of dental practitioners is constituted of friendly and accountable staff participants who offer a streamlined appointment process, while with the intention that our interaction with patients is always delightful and remarkable. This way, we have managed to attract many consumers to our health facility in Massachusetts, and we consider that our friendliness and popularity as a whole discuss on our behalf.

We perform in a blank and brand new office

Most people in the market hold the belief that restaurant restrooms are an indication of kitchen cleanliness. On the other hand, the same will also be said a couple of dentist’s place of job in Massachusetts. For this reason, we have invested in a clean and up to date office which could also be furnished with updated equipment to help us do a neat job. Each client who walks thru our doorways end up feeling glad after understanding that we’re without equal professionals with regards to dental care and remedy. Find a dentist office near me.

We are very so much concerned with serving others

This can be very tricky to seek out dentists who’re actually dedicated to serving others. Some people do it for the money and not as it’s a calling. On the other hand, like every other industry, the dental trade is instantly evolving to adopt issues that might now not be related to dentists some 2 a long time ago.

Our team of workers contributors are releasing themselves up in order to commit their time to affected person. We additionally focus on working with complex era and coaching fabrics with a purpose to offer the latest state-of-the-art dental care throughout the larger space of Massachusetts. Our effort and time is directed against getting to patients, and therefore handing over awesome affected person care is our number one function.

Subsequently, whilst so much patients search for the most productive Dentist in Massachusetts, we ceaselessly make the most productive candidate to select considering the fact that we’re very worrying, figuring out and social. This has allowed us to scale up our operation with a purpose to meet the rising needs of our patients. It is for that reason that you must most probably check out us and see what we need to be offering.

North Carver, Massachusetts

Town
Town Hall

Town Hall
Official seal of Town of Carver
Seal
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 41°53′00″N 70°45′47″WCoordinates: 41°53′00″N 70°45′47″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Plymouth
Settled 1660
Incorporated 1790
Government
 • Type Open town meeting
Area
 • Total 39.7 sq mi (102.9 km2)
 • Land 37.4 sq mi (96.9 km2)
 • Water 2.3 sq mi (6.0 km2)
Elevation 92 ft (28 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 11,509
 • Density 290/sq mi (110/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 02330
Area code(s) 508 / 774
FIPS code 25-11665
GNIS feature ID 0618337
Website www.carverma.org

A sign for Edaville Railroad along Route 58

Carver is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 11,509 at the 2010 census.[1] It is named for John Carver, the first governor of the Plymouth Colony.

History and overview[edit]

Carver separated from Plympton, Massachusetts, and was incorporated in 1790 because many residents lived too far away to attend church in Plympton. The town was named for John Carver, the first Governor of the Plymouth Colony. Initially agricultural, Carver was known for the iron ore from its swamp lands used to make cooking tools by the 1730s. The first iron works was “Pope’s Point Furnace”, built in 1732, which operated for a century by using the bogs and Sampson’s Pond. Over the next 150 years, sheep shearing and lumber mills were important in Carver.[2]

Most people at the time lived in the villages of South and North Carver and Wenham, later called East Carver. European settlers had also given the names “Colchester” and “Lakenham” to what is now North Carver, and settled in what was known as South Meadow. Each village supported at least one schoolhouse. As the market for iron ore declined in the latter part of the 19th century, Carver began cranberry farming as a new use for the town’s swamplands. Farmers began growing cranberries in the 1870s, and by 1900 it was Carver’s farmers who raised a fifth of all cranberries grown in the United States. A railroad line connected Carver to New York and Boston in 1890, further establishing the town.[2]

Money from the iron helped the community to grow, as evidenced by several mansions still in existence in the town. Also located in Carver is Savery’s Avenue, the first divided highway in America, which was opened to the public in 1860[3] by William Savery. The trees between the roads and on the outside of them were to be left for “shade and ornament for man and beast”. Both road beds were macadamized in 1907. A portion of the expense was advanced by the daughters of the builder, Mrs. Mary P.S. Jowitt and Ms. H.D. Savery. By the 1940s the cranberry harvest was the largest in the world, and today it is still a major business in town. Because of the land taken for the bogs, however, growth is limited, giving the town a rural flavor it takes pride in.[4] In 2012, most cranberry bogs are being replanted in favor of a new hybrid cranberry crop.

Carver also has two notable tourist attractions. Edaville Railroad is a narrow-gauge railroad attraction which opened in 1949. It has long been a family tourist attraction in Southeastern Massachusetts, especially for its festival of lights around Christmastime. It has experienced a revival in recent years, after being sold in 1991 and nearly closing. The town is also the site of King Richard’s Faire, a re-creation of a 16th-century English fair which is open on weekends throughout September and October. It is New England‘s largest Renaissance fair.[5]

Pro wrestler Mike Bennett is from Carver.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 39.7 square miles (102.9 km2), of which 37.4 square miles (96.9 km2) is land and 2.3 square miles (6.0 km2), or 5.87%, is water.[6] It is locally famous for the large number of cranberry bogs throughout the town. Carver is bordered by Plympton to the north, Kingston to the northeast, Plymouth to the east, Wareham to the south, and Middleborough to the west. Carver is located approximately 45 miles (72 km) south-southeast of Boston and 38 miles (61 km) east of Providence, Rhode Island.

Carver’s geography is shaped by its many small brooks, rivers and ponds including Vaughn Pond. The majority of them eventually drain into Buzzards Bay, although some in the north of town lead to Cape Cod Bay or Narragansett Bay. The town also has an abundance of pine and cedar trees, and a portion of Myles Standish State Forest takes up much of the southeast corner of town. A large cedar swamp occupies the geographic center of the town. The town is also the site of a campground, a sportsmen’s club, and a small town park at the center of town.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[17] of 2000, there were 11,163 people, 3,984 households, and 3,011 families residing in the town. The population density was 297.3 people per square mile (114.8/km²). There were 4,127 housing units at an average density of 109.9 per square mile (42.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 95.78% White, 1.22% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.96% from other races, and 1.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.82% of the population.

There were 3,984 households out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.3% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the town the population was spread out with 27.3% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 22.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $53,506, and the median income for a family was $61,738. Males had a median income of $46,414 versus $28,336 for females. The per capita income for the town was $20,398. About 4.6% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 10.8% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Carver is represented in the Massachusetts House of Representatives as a part of the Second Plymouth district, which also includes Wareham and a portion of Middleborough. The town is represented in the Massachusetts Senate as a part of the First Plymouth and Bristol district, which includes Berkley, Bridgewater, Dighton, Marion, Middleborough, Raynham, Taunton and Wareham.[18] The town is patrolled by the Fourth (Middleborough) Barracks of Troop D of the Massachusetts State Police.[19]

On the national level, Carver is a part of Massachusetts’s 9th congressional district, and is currently represented by Bill Keating. The state’s senior (Class I) member of the United States Senate, elected in 2012, is Elizabeth Warren. The junior (Class II) senator is Ed Markey, who was elected in 2013 to finish John Kerry‘s term when he became Secretary of State.

Carver is governed by the open town meeting form of government, led by a town administrator and a board of selectmen. Carver has its own police, ALS ambulance and fire departments, with a central police station, central ambulance station and three on-call firehouses, located in the north, south and center of town.

There are also three post offices. The main ZIP code is 02330. There was also 2 other P.O. Box zipcodes 02355 (North Carver Post Office) and 02366 (South Carver Post Office) originally. Now all three ZIP codes are used for general mail. 02330 All of Carver (but mainly Center Carver), 02355 (North Carver or East Carver), and 02366 (South Carver). The town’s public library is located in the center of town, and is a part of the SAILS Library Network.

Education[edit]

Carver operates its own school department, led by a school committee and a superintendent of schools. There are two schools, each of which serves specific grade levels. The Carver Elementary serves pre-kindergarten through fifth grades;[20] and the Carver Middle-High School serves sixth through twelfth grades.[21]

In addition to the town high school, students may also choose to attend Old Colony Regional Vocational Technical High School in Rochester. They may also chose to attend Norfolk County Agricultural High School in Walpole or Bristol County Agricultural High School in Dighton. There are no private schools in the town; the nearest are in Kingston, Lakeville and Taunton.

Transportation Department[edit]

Carver operates and owns their own buses for Carver and all out of district schools except Old Colony Regional. For the middle-high school they also run a late bus Monday to Thursday, and not on half days.

Transportation[edit]

The town is crossed in the north of town by U.S. Route 44, a two-lane divided highway which meets Route 3 (Massachusetts) in Plymouth. The highway was recently expanded, so that rather than the highway portion ending at Route 58 (the other main route), whose right-of-way extends into Carver to a few miles after the Carver/Wareham town line. The nearest national and international airport is Logan International Airport in Boston. Another national airport nearby is T. F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Carver town, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2012.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b Master Plan Section 5: Historical and Cultural Resources, p. 2
  3. Jump up^ Henry S. Griffith, History of the Town of Carver, Massachusetts: Historical Review, 1637-1910, New Bedford, MA: E. Anthony & Sons, 1913.
  4. Jump up^ Town of Carver – History
  5. Jump up^ “Renaissance Faire brings escape from 21st century”. Patriot Ledger. 2008-09-23. Retrieved 2009-08-10.
  6. Jump up^ “Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Carver town, Massachusetts”. U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2012.
  7. Jump up^ “TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1”. American FactFinder, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts. United States Census Bureau. 2010.
  8. Jump up^ “Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision – GCT-T1. Population Estimates”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  9. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  10. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  13. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12,2011.
  14. Jump up^ “1870 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  15. Jump up^ “1860 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  16. Jump up^ “1850 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1854. Pages 338 through 393. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  17. Jump up^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  18. Jump up^ Index of Legislative Representation by City and Town, from Mass.gov
  19. Jump up^ Station D-4, SP Middleborough
  20. Jump up^ http://www.schooldigger.com/go/MA/schools/0336002661/school.aspx
  21. Jump up^ Carver Middle/High School Schooldigger.com

External links[edit]

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Duxbury, Massachusetts

Duxbury, Massachusetts
Town
Duxbury Town Offices

Duxbury Town Offices
Official seal of Duxbury, Massachusetts
Seal
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°02′30″N 70°40′22″WCoordinates: 42°02′30″N 70°40′22″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Plymouth
Settled 1624
Incorporated 1637
Government
 • Type Open town meeting
Area
 • Total 37.6 sq mi (97.4 km2)
 • Land 23.8 sq mi (61.5 km2)
 • Water 13.9 sq mi (35.9 km2)
Elevation 36 ft (11 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 15,059
 • Density 632.7/sq mi (244.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 02332
Area code(s) 339 / 781
FIPS code 25-17895
GNIS feature ID 0618338
Website www.town.duxbury.ma.us

Duxbury (older spelling, “Duxborough”) is a coastal town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. A suburb of Boston, located on the South Shoreapproximately 35 miles (56 km) to the southeast of the city, the population was 15,059 at the 2010 census.

Geographic and demographic information on the specific parts of the town of Duxbury is available in articles Cedar Crest, Duxbury (CDP), Duxbury Beach, and South Duxbury, respectively.

History[edit]

The area now known as Duxbury was inhabited by people as early as 12,000 to 9,000 B.C. By the time European settlers arrived here, the region was inhabited by the Wampanoags, who called this place Mattakeesett, meaning “place of many fish.”[1]

In 1620, the English settlers known as the Pilgrims established their colony in Plymouth. Per the terms of their contract with financial backers in London, they were required to live together in a tight community for seven years. At the end of that term in 1627, land along the coast was allotted to settlers for farming. Thus, the coastline from Plymouth to Marshfield was parceled out, and many settlers began moving away from Plymouth.[1]

At first, those who settled in Duxbury came to work their new farms just in the warmer months and returned to Plymouth during the winter. It was not long, however, before they began to build homes on their land, and soon requested permission from the colony to be set off as a separate community with their own church. Duxbury, which originally included land that is now Pembroke, was incorporated in 1637.[1]

Some of the most influential men in the colony received grants in Duxbury and became its first leaders. Captain Myles Standish, the military leader of the colony, lived in “the Nook,” an area now known as Standish Shore. Elder William Brewster was for many years the religious leader of the colony, in which he led services to the colony until it received its own minister in 1637. John Alden was another important settler. His house, now a museum on Alden Street, was the site of many important meetings of the colony’s leaders. The graves of some of Duxbury’s first settlers can be found in the Old Burying Ground on Chestnut Street, next to the site of original meetinghouse.[1] Theory has it that the town was named by Myles Standish after the family estate of his childhood in Lancashire. The ancient Standish family in northern England owned much land and large estates, including the two main family headquarters of Standish Hall and Duxbury Manor, in Lancashire, since before the Middle Ages. Myles Standish’s will delineates his inheritance rights to very particular lands near and around Standish and mostly Duxbury Manor, stating his descent from both lines of the Standish family; and so it has been suggested that he named the new town in Massachusetts after the estate where he grew up.

Duxbury was primarily a farming community throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. Its quiet history in the 18th century was interrupted only by the Revolutionary War.[1]

The most remarkable period in Duxbury’s history, the shipbuilding era, began immediately after the American Revolution. Following the Treaty of Paris, the newborn nation was granted fishing rights on the Grand Banks. Several families took advantage of the new opportunity and began to build large fishing schooners. Soon, the schooners built in the 1790s gave way to larger brigs and eventually three-masted ships. As several merchant families began to amass large fleets, shipyards and other ancillary industries flourished and Duxbury prospered. By the 1840s, Duxbury boasted about 20 shipyards and produced an average of ten large sailing vessels per year.[1]

John Alden House, built 1653

Beach and residences c. 1910

Early industry[edit]

The largest industry in Duxbury was owned by Ezra Weston, who came to be known as “King Caesar” due to his success and influence. Weston began building small vessels in 1764 and soon became famous for his successful merchant fleet. His son, Ezra II, who inherited his father’s kingly sobriquet, would bring the industry to its height. By 1841, the younger King Caesar had constructed the largest vessel built in New England up to that time. The ship Hope was an astounding 880 tons. Lloyd’s of London recognized Weston as the owner of the largest fleet in America, and this judgment was confirmed by Daniel Webster in a speech in 1841. His empire, a fore-runner of vertical integration, dominated the town.[1] The King Caesar House is now a museum owned by the Duxbury Rural and Historical Society.

The shipbuilding era in Duxbury ended as quickly as it began. By the 1850s, sailing vessels were made obsolete by other modes of transportation such as steamships and railroads. While other Massachusetts towns grew, Duxbury went into a long economic decline.[1]

There was, however, a silver lining. By the 1870s, Duxbury’s rural character and unspoiled bay began to attract summer visitors. Duxbury soon gained a reputation as an idyllic summer resort. With the 1871 completion of the Duxbury & Cohasset Railroad,[2] large numbers of city-folk from Boston could pay $1.50 for a round-trip ticket and enjoy Duxbury’s refreshing environment. Boarding houses sprang up everywhere. The Miles Standish Hotel on the Nook soon became enormously popular. The Myles Standish monument, completed in 1898, was a result of this tourist influx.[1]

This pattern continued in Duxbury well into the 20th century. It was not until the construction of Route 3 that transportation to Boston became expedient and the town’s population exploded with the arrival of thousands of year-round residents.[1]

Geography[edit]

View of Bluefish River inlet with King Caesar House in background (left)

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 37.6 square miles (97.4 km²), of which, 23.8 square miles (61.5 km²) is land and 13.9 square miles (35.9 km²) (36.87%) is water. Duxbury is bordered by Cape Cod Bay to the east, Duxbury Bay, Kingston Bay and Plymouth to the southeast, Kingston to the southwest, Pembroke to the west and northwest, and Marshfield to the north. The town’s border with Plymouth is due to the town’s having the only land access to Saquish Neck, a thin, hook-shaped strip of land along Duxbury Bay whose tip is in Plymouth.

Duxbury is the sixth largest cranberry producer in Massachusetts. It has come to be known in recent years also for its oyster beds, as well as other shellfish. The town has many ponds and bogs throughout. The Back River lies along the western edge of Saquish Neck, and has many tributaries from the local rivers, brooks and marshes. There are several sanctuaries, a conservation area and other forests within the town, especially in the western half.

It also has many recreational parks available for hiking, dog walking, horseback trail riding and bike riding.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1850 2,679
1860 2,597 −3.1%
1870 2,341 −9.9%
1880 2,196 −6.2%
1890 1,908 −13.1%
1900 2,075 +8.8%
1910 1,688 −18.7%
1920 1,553 −8.0%
1930 1,696 +9.2%
1940 2,359 +39.1%
1950 3,167 +34.3%
1960 4,727 +49.3%
1970 7,636 +61.5%
1980 11,807 +54.6%
1990 13,895 +17.7%
2000 14,248 +2.5%
2010 15,059 +5.7%
* = population estimate.
Source: United States Censusrecords and Population Estimates Programdata.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

As of the census[13] of 2010, there were 15,059 people, 5,344 households, and 4,162 families residing in the town. The population density was 632.7 people per square mile (244.9/km²). There were 5,875 housing units at an average density of 246.7 per square mile (86.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.0% White, 0.60% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 1.40% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.20% of the population.

There were 5,344 households, of which 38.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.1% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.1% were non-families. 19.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the town the population was spread out with 22.6% under the age of 15; 7.6% from 15 to 19; 5.3% from 20 to 29; 7.0% from 30 to 39; 17.5% from 40 to 49; 23.7% from 50 to 64 and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.8 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $97,124; and the median income for a family was $106,245. Males had a median income of $77,228 versus $41,730 for females. The per capita income for the town was $40,242. About 1.2% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 3.1% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

On the national level, Duxbury is a part of Massachusetts’s 9th congressional district, and is currently represented by Bill Keating. The state’s senior (Class II) member of the United States Senate, elected in 2012, is Elizabeth Warren. The junior (Class I) senator is Ed Markey.

On the state level, Duxbury is represented in the Massachusetts House of Representatives as a part of the Sixth and the Twelfth Plymouth districts; the Sixth includes the towns of Hanson, Pembroke, and precincts 2-6 of Duxbury. The Twelfth includes all or parts of the towns of Halifax, Kingston, Middleborough, Plymouth, Plympton, and precinct 1 of Duxbury. The town is represented in the Massachusetts Senate as a part of the Plymouth and Norfolk district, which includes the towns of Cohasset, Duxbury, Hingham, Hull, Marshfield, Norwell, Scituate and Weymouth.[14] The town is patrolled by the First (Norwell) Barracks of Troop D of the Massachusetts State Police.[15]

Duxbury is governed by the open town meeting form of government, and is led by a town manager and a board of selectmen. The town operates its own police and fire departments, with the police station and central fire station located in the southeast and additional fire station in the northwest parts of town. There are two post offices in town; one is at Hall’s Corner (near Goose Point) and the other is at Snug Harbor, along Duxbury Bay just south of Powder Point. The Duxbury Free Library is located in the heart of town, next to the John Alden House, and is a member of the Old Colony Library Network. The town also has a highway department, located behind the Town Hall, and a harbormaster, whose office is located next to the Duxbury Yacht Club near Snug Harbor. Duxbury is located within ten miles (16 km) of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, and as such has a well-organized emergency management agency. The nearest hospitals are Jordan Hospital in Plymouth, South Shore Hospital in Weymouth, and Brockton Hospital.

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 15, 2008[16]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Democratic 2,236 20.13%
Republican 2,545 22.91%
Unaffiliated 6,277 56.51%
Minor Parties 50 0.45%
Total 11,108 100%

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

Over $26 million of Duxbury’s annual budget is devoted to the town’s nationally recognized public school system. According to Newsweek magazine’s 2005, 2006 and 2007 rankings of the Nation’s Top 1200 Public High Schools (the top 5% of public school systems), Duxbury was ranked at 246, 185 and 142 respectively. By 2013 though, it had fallen off of the Newsweek national rankings and locally, Boston Magazine’s yearly town/school rankings, dropped it out of a top 40 spot.[17]

Duxbury operates its own school system for the town’s approximately 3,400 students, serving preschool through 12th grade. Chandler School is located near Tree of Knowledge Corner in the west of town and serves students from pre-kindergarten through second grade. The Alden Elementary School, near the John Alden House, serves grades 3-5.

Duxbury High School is on Saint George Street and serves grades 9-12. Duxbury High School was just recently rebuilt into a new building along with Duxbury Middle School called the 21st Learning experience. Duxbury’s athletic teams are known as the Dragons, and their colors are green and white. Their chief rival is Marshfield High School, team mascot the Rams, and they play against them in the Thanksgiving Day Tournament. It is an important local event whose rivalry goes back 30 years.

Private schools[edit]

There are two private schools located in Duxbury. Bay Farm Montessori Academy is a private, independent school located in the southern corner of town and serves Toddlers through grade 8. Good Shepherd Christian Academy is a private, Christian school which serves students from kindergarten through eighth grade. The nearest private high school is Sacred Heart in Kingston. The town does not have any agreements with vocational schools.

Transportation[edit]

Bus[edit]

For buses in Duxbury, the local Greater Attleboro Taunton Regional Transit Authority (GATRA) bus passes through the town on the SAIL line (Seaside Area Inter-town Link) and it stops at Halls Corner shopping district (South Duxbury), Island Creek, Millbrook Motors (Cox Corner), and the Duxbury Free Library (Millbrook). Another Bus Line that goes through Duxbury is the P&B Line (Plymouth & Brockton) which stops at Millbrook Motors (Cox Corner). The last bus line that goes through Duxbury is the Greyhound Bus Line which runs national service and into Canada, which stops at Millbrook Motors (Cox Corner).

Road[edit]

Route 3, a two-lane freeway also known as the Pilgrims Highway, passes through the town, with two exits granting access to the town from it. Routes 3A, 14, 53 and 139 also pass through the town. Routes 14 and 139 both end in the town, and Route 53 ends less than 1/2 mile south of the town line, at Route 3A.

Other[edit]

There is no rail or air service in town. The Kingston-Plymouth Line of the MBTA’s commuter rail passes through (and terminates in) neighboring Kingston and Plymouth, as the southern end of a route which starts at South Station in Boston. The nearest municipal airport is Marshfield Municipal Airport; the nearest national and international air service can be reached at Logan International Airport in Boston.

Duxbury Yacht Club[edit]

The Duxbury Yacht Club near Snug Harbor was founded in 1875 and incorporated in 1895. As part of the club’s 120th anniversary celebrations, David A. Mittell wrote ‘The Duxbury Yacht Club story’ [18]

Notable people[edit]

Points of interest[edit]

The Myles Standish Monument, not far from the site of his home

Powder Point Bridge

Media[edit]

Newspapers[edit]

Television[edit]

Radio[edit]

  • WDSU, internet radio

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j Duxbury in Brief: A Historical Sketch
  2. Jump up^ Massachusetts Board of Railroad Commissioners, Annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners Boston, Massachusetts 1878 — Duxbury & Cohasset Railroad
  3. Jump up^ “TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1”. American FactFinder, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts. United States Census Bureau. 2010.
  4. Jump up^ “Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision – GCT-T1. Population Estimates”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  5. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  6. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  7. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  8. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  9. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12,2011.
  10. Jump up^ “1870 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. Jump up^ “1860 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. Jump up^ “1850 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1854. Pages 338 through 393. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  13. Jump up^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  14. Jump up^ Index of Legislative Representation by City and Town, from Mass.gov
  15. Jump up^ Station D-1, SP Norwell
  16. Jump up^ “Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 15, 2008” (PDF). Massachusetts Elections Division. Retrieved 2010-05-08.
  17. Jump up^ http://www.bostonmagazine.com/boston-best-schools-2013/
  18. Jump up^ David A. Mittell wrote ‘The Duxbury Yacht Club story : founded 1875, incorporated 1895′(Attleboro, Mass.: The Club, Colonial Lithograph, 1995)
  19. ^ Jump up to:a b Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Marquis Who’s Who. 1967.
  20. Jump up^ Title: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations- George Soule, Volume 3; Author: John E Soule, Col. and Milton E. Perry, Ph.D.; Publication: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1980; Abbrev: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations- George Soule, Volume 3
  21. Jump up^ “Stick Figure Music | About Stick Figure | Stick Figure Reggae”. www.stickfiguremusic.com. Retrieved 2016-02-02.
  22. Jump up^ The Art Complex Museum – Home Page
  23. Jump up^ First Parish Duxbury UU Church Home Page
  24. Jump up^ Gershom Bradford House at duxburyhistory.org
  25. Jump up^ King Caesar House
  26. Jump up^ Myles Standish Monument State Reservation
  27. Jump up^ North Hill Marsh page at Mass Audubon

External links[edit]

Dentist in Worthington, Mass. 01098

doctor, dentist, dental

There are many Dentists in Massachusetts. If truth be told, all of them have get admission to to mounted requirements of training, techniques and information concerning the latest construction in the dental box. On the other hand, now not they all are excellent at what they do, and which means that in case you happen to fall of their fingers, you’re going to get mediocre services or a minimum of really feel so, way to the truth that every individual has their own personalities and attitudes which would possibly not resonate neatly with all sufferers. However that’s additionally where we are available whilst you discuss discovering the best dentist in Massachusetts. Find a dentist office near me.

We’re pleasant and responsible

Our body of workers have a prime stage of expertise in all dental areas, plus we are devoted and overly formidable in our process. As a result of the captivating personalities of our team contributors, sufferers have consistently built the sensation of accept as true with in our judgement. For some unexplained purposes, our purchasers have at all times depended on that we’re the most efficient in Massachusetts. They have at all times established confidence that we are the right other people to attend to their dental needs. However how will we be able to deal with this dating with our clients? Find a dentist office near me.

Smartly, our staff of dental practitioners is made out of pleasant and accountable body of workers contributors who offer a streamlined appointment process, even as with the intention that our interplay with sufferers is always pleasant and memorable. This manner, we’ve controlled to draw many purchasers to our sanatorium in Massachusetts, and we imagine that our friendliness and reputation as an entire discuss on our behalf.Find a dentist office near me.

We function in a blank and up to date office

Most of the people out there hold the conclusion that restaurant restrooms are a sign of kitchen cleanliness. Alternatively, the same can be stated about a dentist’s place of job in Massachusetts. For this reason, now we have invested in a blank and brand new place of work which may be provided with updated apparatus to help us do a neat task. Every consumer who walks via our doorways end up feeling glad after realizing that we are the ultimate execs on the subject of dental care and treatment.

We are very a lot excited by serving others

This can be very tricky to find dentists who are actually dedicated to serving others. Some folks do it for the cash and no longer as it’s a calling. On the other hand, like every other industry, the dental industry is instantly evolving to adopt things that would no longer be related to dentists a few 2 many years ago.

Our personnel individuals are releasing themselves up as a way to commit their time to patient. We also center of attention on running with complicated technology and coaching fabrics with the intention to be offering the up to date state-of-the-art dental care inside the higher space of Massachusetts. Our effort and time is directed towards getting to patients, and therefore turning in superior affected person care is our no 1 function.

Subsequently, whilst so much patients look for the most efficient Dentist in Massachusetts, we ceaselessly make the best candidate to pick when you consider that we are very caring, working out and social. This has allowed us to scale up our operation as a way to meet the rising needs of our sufferers. It is for that reason that you should almost certainly try us and notice what we have to be offering.

Worthington, Massachusetts

Worthington, Massachusetts
Town
Corners Grocery

Corners Grocery
Official seal of Worthington, Massachusetts
Seal
Location in Hampshire County in Massachusetts
Location in Hampshire County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°23′50″N 72°56′10″WCoordinates: 42°23′50″N 72°56′10″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Hampshire
Settled 1764
Incorporated 1768
Government
 • Type Open town meeting
Area
 • Total 32.1 sq mi (83.1 km2)
 • Land 32.1 sq mi (83.0 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Elevation 1,433 ft (437 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 1,156
 • Density 39.6/sq mi (15.3/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01098
Area code(s) 413
FIPS code 25-82175
GNIS feature ID 0618212
Website http://www.worthington-ma.us/

Worthington is a town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 1,156 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Springfield, MassachusettsMetropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Worthington was first settled in 1764 and was officially incorporated in 1768.

        The towns officials had settled for new land after the settling of Northampton Massachusetts in 1654. The towns oldest buildings are believed to be around the west side near Middlefield, (surrounding town) and built somewhere near the late 1740's to 1750's

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 32.1 square miles (83.1 km²), of which 32.1 square miles (83.0 km²) is land and 0.04 square mile (0.1 km²) (0.12%) is water.

Demographics[edit]

At the 2000 census,[11] there were 1,270 people, 503 households and 363 families residing in the town. The population density was 39.6 per square mile (15.3/km²). There were 582 housing units at an average density of 18.2 per square mile (7.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.27% White, 0.31% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.24% Asian, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.02% of the population.

There were 503 households of which 31.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.8% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.96.

24.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 26.8% from 25 to 44, 31.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 98.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.6 males.

The median household income was $53,047 and the median family income was $60,132. Males had a median income of $42,500 compared with $26,438 for females. The per capita income for the town was $24,190. About 1.5% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 1.4% of those age 65 or over.

In popular culture[edit]

Worthington is discussed by name in the Aaron Lewis song “Massachusetts” and referenced by the population size in “Country Boy”. Both songs are on the album Town Line, released in 2011.

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “TOTAL POPULATION (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1”. American FactFinder, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts. United States Census Bureau. 2010.
  2. Jump up^ “Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision – GCT-T1. Population Estimates”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  3. Jump up^ “1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  4. Jump up^ “1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts” (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12,2011.
  5. Jump up^ “1950 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  6. Jump up^ “1920 Census of Population” (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  7. Jump up^ “1890 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  8. Jump up^ “1870 Census of the Population” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  9. Jump up^ “1860 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  10. Jump up^ “1850 Census” (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1854. Pages 338 through 393. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. Jump up^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.

External links[edit]

Dentist in Brockton, Mass. 02302

doctor, dentist, dental

There are lots of Dentists in Massachusetts. If truth be told, all of them have access to fixed requirements of coaching, ways and information in regards to the contemporary development in the dental field. Then again, no longer they all are good at what they do, and because of this in the event you happen to fall in their arms, you’re going to get mediocre services and products or no less than feel so, way to the truth that every particular person has their own personalities and attitudes which would possibly not resonate well with all sufferers. However that’s also where we come in while you speak about finding the most productive dentist in Massachusetts. Find a dentist office near me.

We are friendly and responsible

Our body of workers have a top level of expertise in all dental spaces, plus we are devoted and overly ambitious in our job. Because of the fascinating personalities of our workforce contributors, patients have consistently built the feeling of trust in our judgement. For some unexplained purposes, our shoppers have all the time depended on that we are the most efficient in Massachusetts. They’ve always proven trust that we’re the appropriate folks to attend to their dental wishes. However how can we be ready to handle this relationship with our purchasers? Find a dentist office near me.

Well, our team of dental practitioners is produced from friendly and accountable group of workers contributors who be offering a streamlined appointment procedure, at the same time as to ensure that our interplay with sufferers is all the time pleasant and memorable. This way, we have managed to draw many purchasers to our hospital in Massachusetts, and we imagine that our friendliness and popularity as an entire speak on our behalf.

We perform in a blank and up to date office

Most of the people out there hold the realization that eating place restrooms are an indication of kitchen cleanliness. Then again, the same can be stated about a dentist’s administrative center in Massachusetts. For this reason, we’ve got invested in a blank and up to date office which may be provided with up to date apparatus to lend a hand us do a neat job. Each consumer who walks via our doors end up feeling satisfied after knowing that we are without equal execs in terms of dental care and treatment. Find a dentist office near me.

We’re very much fascinated with serving others

It is extremely tricky to seek out dentists who are really dedicated to serving others. A few other folks do it for the cash and not because it’s a calling. However, like some other trade, the dental industry is instantly evolving to adopt issues that would no longer be related to dentists a few 2 decades ago.

Our body of workers members are liberating themselves up to be able to devote their time to patient. We additionally center of attention on operating with complex technology and training fabrics so as to be offering the up to date state of the art dental care inside the greater house of Massachusetts. Our effort and time is directed in opposition to getting to patients, and thus turning in awesome patient care is our no 1 function.

Subsequently, while such a lot sufferers look for the most productive Dentist in Massachusetts, we ceaselessly make the best candidate to select because we’re very being concerned, understanding and social. This has allowed us to scale up our operation in order to meet the rising needs of our patients. It is for this reason that you must almost certainly check out us and notice what we need to offer.

Brockton, Massachusetts

Brockton, Massachusetts
City
City Hall

City Hall
Official seal of Brockton, Massachusetts
Seal
Nickname(s): The City of Champions
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts
Brockton, Massachusetts is located in the US

Brockton, Massachusetts
Brockton, Massachusetts

Location in the United States

Coordinates: 42°05′00″N 71°01′08″WCoordinates: 42°05′00″N 71°01′08″W
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Plymouth
Settled 1700
Incorporated 1821
Government
 • Type Mayor-council city
 • Mayor William Carpenter (Independent)
Area
 • Total 21.6 sq mi (55.9 km2)
 • Land 21.5 sq mi (55.6 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
Elevation 112 ft (34 m)
Population (2015)
 • Total 95,314
 • Density 4,363.3/sq mi (1,687.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 02301
02302
02303
02304
02305
Area code(s) 508/774
FIPS code 25-09000
GNIS feature ID 0617571
Website www.brockton.ma.us

Brockton is a city in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States; the population was 95,314 in the 2015 Census. Brockton, along with Plymouth, are the county seats of Plymouth County.[1] Brockton is the seventh largest city in Massachusetts and is sometimes referred to as the “City of Champions”, due to the success of native boxers Rocky Marciano and Marvin Hagler, as well as its successful Brockton High School sports programs. Two of the villages within the city are Montello and Campello, both have the distinction of having their own MBTA Commuter Rail Stations and post offices. Campello is the smallest neighborhood in the city, but also the most populous. Brockton hosts a baseball team, the Brockton Rox. Brockton is one of the windiest cities in the United States, with an average wind speed of 14.3 mph.[2]

History[edit]

In 1649, Ousamequin (Massasoit) sold the surrounding land, then known as Saughtucket, to Myles Standish as an addition to Duxbury. Brockton was part of this area, which the English renamed Bridgewater, until 1821, when it became the town of North Bridgewater. Its name changed in 1874, after a contentious process finally decided on naming it after Isaac Brock, after a local merchant heard of Brockville, Ontario, on a trip to Niagara Falls. Brockton became a city on April 9, 1881. During the American Civil War, Brockton was America’s largest producer of shoes, and until the latter parts of the 20th century Brockton had a large shoe and leather products industry.[3][citation needed]

Historical firsts[edit]

World firsts
  • On October 1, 1883, Brockton became the first place in the world to have a three-wire underground electrical system when Thomas Edison threw a switch to activate it.[4]
  • The City Theater opened on October 24, 1894, the first theater in the world to be tied into the three-wire electrical system.
US firsts
  • On December 30, 1884, the first electrically operated fire station in the United States opened in Brockton.
  • The department store Santa Claus appeared in Brockton in December 1890, when James Edgar, of Edgar’s Department Store, suited up for the first time.[5]
  • Brockton became the first city in the country to abolish grade crossings in 1896.
World Records
  • On November 23, 2010, Brockton set the world record for the most Santa Hat wearers in one place at one time with 872 people participating in the event.[6]
  • On November 20, 2011 Brockton doubled the city’s Santa Claus hat-wearing record with 1792 people in downtown Brockton wearing hats.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 21.6 square miles (56 km2), of which 21.5 square miles (56 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.56%) is water. Brockton is the 162nd largest city by land area in the Commonwealth, and the twelfth largest of the twenty-seven towns in Plymouth County. Brockton is bordered by Stoughton to the northwest, Avon to the north, Holbrook to the northeast, Abington to the northeast, Whitman and East Bridgewater to the southeast, West Bridgewater to the south, and Easton to the west. Brockton is approximately 25 miles south of Boston, and 30 miles northeast of Providence, Rhode Island.

Brockton is mostly an urban setting, lying along the Salisbury Plain River, which once powered the many shoe factories of the city. To the northeast lies the Beaver Brook Conservation Land, attached to the southern end of the Ames Nowell State Park in Abington. There are several parks throughout the city, but the largest is D.W. Field Park, an Olmsted-inspired park which includes ponds, Waldo Lake and Brockton Reservoir in Avon, as well as a golf course.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1830 1,953
1840 2,616 +33.9%
1850 3,939 +50.6%
1860 6,584 +67.1%
1870 8,007 +21.6%
1880 13,608 +70.0%
1890 27,294 +100.6%
1900 40,063 +46.8%
1910 56,878 +42.0%
1920 66,254 +16.5%
1930 63,797 −3.7%
1940 62,343 −2.3%
1950 62,860 +0.8%
1960 72,813 +15.8%
1970 89,040 +22.3%
1980 95,172 +6.9%
1990 92,788 −2.5%
2000 94,304 +1.6%
2010 93,810 −0.5%
2014 94,779 +1.0%
2015 95,314 +0.6%
* = population estimate.
Source: United States Censusrecords and Population Estimates Programdata.[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17]
Source:
U.S. Decennial Census[18]

As of the census[19] of 2010, there were 93,810 people, 35,552 households, and 22,764 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,398.4 people per square mile (1,695.9/km2). There were 34,837 housing units at an average density of 1,622.8 per square mile (626.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 46.7% White (42.9% non-Hispanic white), 31.2% African American, 0.36% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 10.32% from other races, and 7.78% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.0% of the population. The African-American population in Brockton has grown significantly in the early 2000s.[citation needed]

2013 estimates state Brockton’s demographics as: 42.8% White, 43.1% African American, 0.4% Native American, 2.0% Asian, 0% Pacific Islander, 10.3% from other races, 3.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.8% of the population.[20]

Brockton has the largest population of Cape Verdean ancestry in the United States, with 9.0% of its population reporting this ancestry.[21] Brockton also reportedly has one of the largest communities of Angolans in the United States.[citation needed]

As of 2000, there were 33,675 households out of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.0% were married couples living together, 19.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.35.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.8% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,507, and the median income for a family was $46,235. Males had a median income of $34,255 versus $26,886 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,163. About 12.1% of families and 14.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.4% of those under age 18 and 12.6% of those age 65 or over. Statistically, Brockton is the most populous and most densely populated community in Plymouth County. It is the sixth largest community in the commonwealth, the largest of the sub-100,000 person cities. However, it is only the twenty-seventh most densely populated community in the Commonwealth.[citation needed]

Income[edit]

Data is from the 2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.[22][23][24]

Rank ZIP Code (ZCTA) Per capita
income
Median
household
income
Median
family
income
Population Number of
households
Massachusetts $35,763 $66,866 $84,900 6,605,058 2,530,147
Plymouth County $35,220 $75,092 $90,431 497,386 179,617
United States $28,155 $53,046 $64,719 311,536,594 115,610,216
1 02302 (East Brockton) $22,728 $61,060 $65,914 34,929 11,516
Brockton $21,942 $49,025 $57,773 93,911 32,856
2 02301 (West Brockton) $21,477 $44,144 $53,080 58,982 21,340

Government[edit]

On the national level, Brockton is a part of Massachusetts’s 8th congressional district, and has been represented since 2001 by Stephen Lynch.

On the state level, Brockton is represented in three districts in the Massachusetts House of Representatives: the Ninth Plymouth, Tenth Plymouth (which includes West Bridgewater and a small portion of Easton), and the Eleventh Plymouth (which includes most of Easton). The city is represented in the Massachusetts Senate as a part of the Second Plymouth and Bristol district, which includes Halifax, Hanover, Hanson, Whitman and portions of East Bridgewater and Easton[25] In addition to the Brockton Police department the city is patrolled by the Fourth (Middleborough) Barracks of Troop D of the Massachusetts State Police.[26] Brockton also has several citizen anti-crime groups including the Guardian Angels and Operation Archangel.

Brockton has a city government led by a mayor and city council. The city elects a mayor for two-year terms. Previous mayors include Winthrop H. Farwell, Jr., John T. Yunits, Jr., David Crosby, Carl Pitaro, Richard Wainwright, John E. Sullivan, Alvin Jack Sims, Joseph H. Downey, George J. Thomas, Sr., and Paul Studenski. James Harrington was elected Mayor in 2005 and began his term in January 2006. He was re-elected November 6, 2007, for another two-year term. He had previously served 16 years as a City Councilor. In the fall of 2009, City Councilor Linda Balzotti defeated Harrington to become the city’s first female mayor. Balzotti was defeated in 2013 by Bill Carpenter who won the election only by 44 votes. In 2009, community activist Jass Stewart was elected to councilor-at-large becoming the first African American to serve in Brockton’s city council. The city council consists of 4 Councilors-at-Large and 7 ward Councilors, one for every ward in the city.

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 15, 2008[27]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Democratic 26,316 50.55%
Republican 4,612 8.86%
Unaffiliated 20,726 39.81%
Minor Parties 408 0.78%
Total 52,062 100%

Healthcare[edit]

Brockton has three hospitals, Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital on the east side, Good Samaritan Medical Center – a Steward Family Hospital (formerly Caritas Good Samaritan, and before that Cardinal Cushing) Hospital to the northwest, and the Brockton Veterans Administration Hospital to the southwest. The VA Hospital is the sponsoring institution for the Harvard South Shore Psychiatry program. It serves as a teaching facility for residents of various medical specialties from Boston University, physician assistant students from Northeastern University, nursing students from the University of Massachusetts Boston and pharmacy students from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.[citation needed]

Brockton has a community health center that serves individuals with low income and poor access to health care at Brockton Neighborhood Health Center.[28]

Fire department[edit]

Central Fire Station, the quarters of Squad A, Ladder 1, and the Deputy Chief

The city of Brockton is protected around the clock by 174 paid, professional firefighters of the city of Brockton Fire Department. The Brockton Fire Department currently operates out of six fire stations, located throughout the city, and maintains a fire apparatus fleet of five engines, three ladders, one squad, one tactical rescue unit and several other special, support, and reserve units. The fire department does not provide EMS services; ambulance coverage is handled by American Medical Response.[29] As of July 1, 2015 Brewster Ambulance of Hyde Park, Massachusetts will take over as the city’s EMS provider.

In 1905, local newspapers recounted many heroic acts by Brockton firefighters during the Grover Shoe Factory disaster.[30] On March 10, 1941, thirteen Brockton firefighters died when the roof collapsed as they were fighting a fire at the Strand Theatre.[31] That fire resulted in one of the worst firefighting tragedies in American history.

Fire station locations and apparatus[edit]

Below is a complete listing of all fire station and apparatus locations in the city of Brockton.[32]

Engine Company Ladder Company Special Unit Chief Address
Squad A Ladder 1 Tac. Support Unit(T.S.U.) 1, Special Operations Unit Car 55(Chief), Car 56(Deputy Chief), Training Officer 1 42 Pleasant St.
Engine 2 945 Main St.
Engine 3 916 N. Main St.
Engine 4, Engine 12 Ladder 2 305 Crescent St.
Engine 5 540 West St.
Engine 7 605 N. Cary St.

Law enforcement and public safety[edit]

The City of Brockton Police Department has roughly 181 sworn members and 31 non-sworn employees. The officers are assigned to the Patrol Division, and Operations Division which includes; Detectives, Narcotics, Gang Unit, Special Weapons And Tactics, K-9, Quality of Life, GREAT Program, Elderly Affairs, and Community Education Units.[33] In addition the city has a volunteer chapter of the Guardian Angels who patrol the city several nights per week.

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

Brockton operates its own school system for the city’s approximately 15,600 students. There are two early education schools (Gilmore and Barrett Russell), ten elementary schools (Angelo, Arnone, Baker, Brookfield, Downey, George, Hancock, Huntington, John F. Kennedy and Raymond), the Davis K-8 school, six middle/junior high schools (North, East, West, South, Ashfield and the Plouffe Academy), Brockton High School and four alternative schools (Goddard, Edison, Champion and B.B. Russell). Brockton High’s athletics teams are called the Boxers (after the city’s undefeated heavyweight boxing champion, Rocky Marciano).[citation needed]

Private schools[edit]

Brockton was home to three parochial schools (Sacred Heart, Saint Casimir and Saint Edward) which merged in 2007 to form two schools. Trinity Lower Campus at the former Saint Edwards school site, and Trinity Upper Campus located on the former site of the Saint Colemans school, one Christian school (South Shore Christian and the Brockton Christian School closed in 2010), and Cardinal Spellman High School, a Catholic high school named for Francis Cardinal Spellman, Brockton area native and former Archbishop of New York. Students may also choose to attend tuition-free Southeastern Regional Vocational Technical High School (in South Easton).[citation needed]

Higher education[edit]

Brockton is the site of Massasoit Community College and Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. The Eastern Nazarene College offers Adult Studies/LEAD classes in Brockton.[34]

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Massachusetts Route 24, a six-lane divided motorway, passes through the west side of the city, with exits at Route 27 to the north and Route 123 to the south. The two routes pass through the center of the city, crossing at that point. Massachusetts Route 28 passes from north to south through the center of the city, The western end of Route 14 (at its intersection with Route 27) and the southern end of Route 37 (at its intersection with Route 28) both are in the city.

Bus[edit]

Brockton has its own bus services, operated by the Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT). Each bus has a designated route running through a section of Brockton, i.e. Montello, Campello, Cary Hill, etc. There are also buses that have routes outside the city. i.e. Bridgewater Industrial Park, Ashmont Station (MBTA subway end-of-line), Stoughton and a connecting bus stop in Montello to the Braintree Station (MBTA subway end-of-line).

Rail[edit]

The Middleborough/Lakeville Line of the MBTA’s commuter line passes through the city on the eastern side, with stops in the Montello and Campello neighborhoods, as well as in the city center, providing service to points south and South Station in Boston north of the city.

Awards and honors[edit]

100 Best Communities for Young People[edit]

Brockton was named one of the 100 Best Communities for Young People in the United States in 2005, 2008, 2010, and 2011. This prestigious award is given out by America’s Promise Alliance in recognition of those communities that are taking action to reduce dropout rates and provide supportive services to youth. Despite the challenges it has had over the years, Brockton has made the success of its youth a high priority and was honored for its continued commitment to education, mentoring and volunteerism. Through the collaborative efforts of the Plymouth County District Attorney’s Office, the Mayor’s Office, the Superintendent and Police Department, along with area nonprofits and parents, the community has flourished with a host of resources for its young people.[35]

Music[edit]

Brockton is home to the Brockton Symphony Orchestra, a community orchestra founded in 1948.[36][37] The orchestra performs five or six concerts per season at local venues such as Brockton’s West Middle School Auditorium and the Oliver Ames Auditorium in the neighboring town of Easton. The orchestra comprises 65 musicians from the greater Brockton area and its musical director since 2007 is James Orent, a guest conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Pops.[38][39]

Amateur sports[edit]

Based at Campanelli Stadium the Brockton Rox play in the Futures Collegiate Baseball League (FCBL). From 2003 through 2011 the team was a member of the independent professional Can-Am League but in 2012 decided to join the amateur FCBL. Collegiate players on FCBL teams, who are looking for more experience and scouting exposure, are offered non-paid playing opportunities.[40]

National Historic Places and points of interest[edit]

Headlines posted in street-corner window of newspaper office (Brockton Enterprise), 60 Main Street, Brockton, Massachusetts, December 1940

Children in the tenement district, December 1940, photo by Jack Delano

W.B. Mason building

Other[edit]

There is a central police station on Commercial Street, six fire stations, and three post offices (the main building, plus branches in Montello and Campello). The city supports three buildings within the Brockton Public Library system. The main library is a Carnegie building and is located at 304 Main Street, and there are two branch libraries.[citation needed]